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Links and Resources for School IPM

 

School IPM 2015 Resources:

Tools

 

Curriculum

 

IPM Standards:


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Introduction & Appendices - HTML Format
Part I. IPM Standards for School Buildings - HTML Format
Part II. IPM Standards for School Grounds - HTML Format
Links and Resources - HTML Format
IPM Standards Fact Sheet/Handout - PDF Format (2 pages, 191 KB)

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Want information on IPM in schools? Visit the school IPM headlines page.


Links & Resources Contents

IPM Administration & Policy

School Landscapes & Grounds

Pest-Specific Links & Resources

School Intro I School Buildings I School Grounds I School Links I
  School Appendices

Scorecard for School Buildings | Scorecard for Pest-Specific IPM Practices | Scorecard for School Grounds | Scorecard for Turf Cultural Management | Scorecard for Plant- and Pest-Specific IPM Practices

 

Join the School IPM E-mail List!

Post your questions to a forum of school IPM professionals from around the country. Read questions and responses from school administrators, Extension specialists, pest management professionals and others working to reduce pest and pesticide risks in schools. The list is open for membership to any person interested in IPM in schools and wishes to discuss this subject with others on the list.

To subscribe, send an e-mail to listserv@lists.ufl.edu. Leave the subject line blank and in the text of the message type the following:

subscribe Schoolbugs-L Your Name

Replace Your Name with your own name. When you subscribe, you will be e-mailed a list of instructions on how to use the list. For more information, visit the Web Site at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/listsrvr.htm

Starting Your IPM Program

Boise, P., and K. Feeney, 1999. Reducing Pesticides in Schools: How Two Elementary Schools Control Common Pests Using Integrated Pest Management Strategies. S. Wright, ed. Community Environmental Council, Santa Barbara, CA. To request a copy, contact 930 Miramonte Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109, Phone: (805) 963-0583, Fax: (805) 962-9080, Email: cecadmin@cecmail.org.

Building Blocks for School IPM.  2002.Crouse, Becky, Ed.; Owens, Kagan, Ed. (Beyond Pesticides, Washington, DC) The manual provides comprehensive information on implementing school IPM, including a practical guide to identifying, preventing, and controlling common school pest problems. It is designed for individuals who are responsible for school pest management. It includes information on why schools should adopt IPM programs, how to develop and implement a program, pest management strategies for structural pests, school IPM experts, a model policy and contract, a non- and least-toxic product guide, and fact sheets on the toxicity of commonly used pesticides in schools. 287p. Contact Beyond Pesticides at National Coalition Against the Misuse of Pesticides, 701 E Street, SE, Suite 200, Washington, DC, 20003, Phone: 202-543-5450, Email: info@beyondpesticides.org.

California Safe Schools.  2003. Los Angeles Unified School District Integrated Pest Management Policy. Web page includes sections entitled Policy Statement, Decision Making Process, Product and Use Approval, Training, Method of IPM Control, Notification, Record Keeping and Reporting, and IPM Procedures Manual. Available at http://www.calisafe.org/policy.html or in pdf format at http://www.calisafe.org/pdf/policy_and_forms.pdf

Daar et al., 1997. Appendix B. How to develop an IPM program. Pp. 159-167. In IPM for Schools: A How-to Manual. Available at http://www.birc.org/schoolmanual.htm.

Hollingsworth. 2000. Integrated Pest Management Guidelines for Structural Pests: Model Guidelines for Training and Implementation. Developed by the Structural Working Group of the Massachusetts IPM Council. Provides a systematic strategy for addressing specific structural pest situations. Serves as an educational tool for pest control professionals, building managers and homeowners who wish to practice integrated pest management. Specific pests include ants, bedbugs, cockroaches, fleas, flies, rodents, subterranean  termites and more. Also includes a list of pest information Web sites. 58 pages. Contact UMass Extension Bookstore, Draper Hall, 40 Campus Center Way, Amherst, MA  01003-9244; phone (413) 545-5539; fax (413) 545-5174; email nates@umext.umass.edu

Koehler, et al., 1999. School IPM Web Site. University of Florida. The national Web site for IPM in schools, including how to get started for parents, administration, faculty/staff and pest managers; basic education and advanced technical information about school IPM; downloadable presentations in html, Acrobat and Powerpoint formats; and links to web sites for state-specific resources, IPM teaching curricula, general IPM, pest control and identification, pesticides and health, State Departments of Education and Health, national and state pest control associations, and fun WWW sites related to school IPM. Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/.

Integrated Pest Management Policy Statement for Maine Schools. 2-page document includes thoughts on IPM techniques, pest management objectives, the IPM coordinator, record keeping, notification and posting, pesticide storage and purchase and pesticide applicators. Available in Word or PDF format at http://www.state.me.us/agriculture/pesticides/schoolipm/.

Lame, M. L.  2005.  A Worm in the Teacher's Apple: Protecting America's School Children from Pests and Pesticides.  238 pp.  Authorhouse ISBN 1-4208-3935-7.  Excellent perspective on the shortcomings of current national policy and efforts to implement real IPM in schools, with success stories and mechanics of a program that has reduced pest complaints and pesticide use by as much as 90% in U.S. schools.  http://www.authorhouse.com/BookStore/ItemDetail~bookid~30222.aspx

Merchant and Merchant, 1997. The ABC’s of IPM Video Series: Module 1. An Introduction; Module 2.  Structural Pest Control; Module 3. Food Handling Areas; Module 4. Bids and Contracts; Module 5. The Administrative Challenge; Module 6. Landscape IPM. Available from Distribution and Supply Office, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, P.O. Box 1209, Bryan TX 77806-1209. (979) 845-6571, Fax (979) 862-1566. Also available from the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, http://tcebookstore.org/pubinfo.cfm?pubid=1665

NC State University and NC A & T State University Cooperative Extension.  2002. IPM for North Carolina Schools. This 49-page document is divided into six parts: 1. What is IPM? 2. Adopting and IPM Program 3. Implementing a School IPM Program 4. Sample Forms 5. How to Develop Bid Invitations for IPM Service in Schools and 6. Resources. Available in PDF form at http://ipm.ncsu.edu/urban/cropsci/SchoolIPM/ schoolipm_manual.pdf

Natural Resource, Agriculture, and Engineering Service (NRAES), 2002.  Integrated Pest Management for Northeast Schools. Introduction that answers the questions What is IPM? and Why Practice IPM in Schools?; Chapter on the Components of an IPM Program; Chapter on Establishing an IPM Program in Your School; Chapter on Managing Pests Found in Northeast Schools including a detailed list of common pests.  Also includes appendices on School IPM Checklist, Examples of Action Thresholds and General Recommendations for Pesticide Applications. Available from NRAES, Cooperative Extension, 152 Riley-Robb Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701.  For more information, contact NRAES by phone at 607-255-7654 or fax at 607-254-8770 or email.

NC State University, Michael Waldvogel.  2003. IPM in Schools PowerPoint.  Includes slides on SEPA, inspection and exculsion, roach management, mice management, fly management, and ant management. Available online at http://ipm.ncsu.edu/urban/cropsci/SchoolIPM/presentations.html

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Rutgers Cooperative Extension. 2004. Model School IPM Plan for New Jersey Schools.  The Model provides schools with a template for compliance with the December 2002 New Jersey School IPM Act. Use of the Model Plan itself is voluntary; schools may directly edit it to suit their needs and pest management issues.  The Model Plan specifies what things schools MUST do to be in compliance with the New Jersey School IPM Act.  The Model Plan is currently available in both pdf and Word files on the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Pest Management Office School IPM webpages, http://www.pestmanagement.rutgers.edu/ipm/ schoolipm/plan.htm. See a model IPM Policy for New Jersey schools here

Pennsylvania IPM Program.  2004. Pennsylvania School IPM Manual. New edition of the manual contains sections on mosquito and tick IPM as well as more references and information on new IPM legislation. The manual also includes chapters on suggestions for setting up an IPM program in schools and developing an IPM policy and a sample policy from the Pennsylvania School Boards Association. Additionally, the manual contains a listing of commonly encountered pests in and around schools as well as information on the biology, identification and management of various types of pests. Available for purchase through the Publications Distribution Center, Penn State University, 112 Agricultural Administration Bldg., University Park, PA. Call (877) 345-0691(toll free) to order by phone.

Purdue University.  2003.  Offering Sound Pest Management Advice to the Public. (PPP-62). 40-page softcover book offers sound and simple advice targeted at retailers (pesticide consultants according to Indiana law) and others who sell pesticides and offer pesticide advice. Covers topics such as Customer Needs, Pest Identifications, Buying Pesticides, Caring for Pesticides at Home, Following Labels, Safety Equipment, Container Disposal, Spills, Hiring a Professional, and web resources. Available to be downloaded for free at http://www.btny.purdue.edu/PPP/

Rutgers Cooperative Extension. 2003.  How NY & NJ Schools Can Make the Grade in School IPM. The one-page brochure details how to get started in IPM.  Outlines where to get information on national and regional (New York and New Jersey) resources and contacts in School IPM. Available at http://www.pestmanagement.rutgers.edu/IPM/SchoolIPM/ brochure.html.

Rutgers Cooperative Extension. 2003. IPM Report Card for School Grounds.  These cards provide a series of self-assessment tools that will allow schools to measure their adoption of IPM on school grounds. There are five report cards divided into the following categories: General Requirements, Athletic Fields, Turf, Ornamental Plants and Landscape Plantings.  Available at http://www.pestmanagement.rutgers.edu/IPM/ SchoolIPM/reportcard.html.

Rutgers Cooperative Extension.  2003.  School IPM Resource Guide for New York and New JerseyThis 39-page resource guide is separated into three sections: General Resources for School IPM & IPM, NJ Resources for School IPM and NY Resources for School IPM. Available at http://www.pestmanagement.rutgers.edu/IPM/SchoolIPM/ resources.html.

Safer Pest Control Project. Many resources including an IPM Handbook, a PDF document that includes chapters titled IPM and notification checklist, summary of state laws requiring IPM and notification, definition of IPM, IPM policy, IPM participants, practicing IPM, and pesticides applications notifications. Also check out the ABC's of IPM Implementation in Your School District. Both are available after free registration at http://www.spcpweb.org/schools/.

University of Florida.  2001.  School IPM Model Contract. Extensive outline designed to be used by officials working in schools, such as purchasing agents, who are responsible for procuring pest management services.  Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/doc/model_contract.htm.

Washington Toxics Coalition. 2001.  Model Least Toxic IPM Policy. Includes sections entitled Pesticide Use and Selection, Notification and Timing, Recordkeeping, Pest Management Committee, Progress Review, Right to Appeal, and Identification and Notification of Sensitive Individuals. Available at http://www.watoxics.org/content/pdf/IPMPolicy.pdf.

Back to Links & Resources - Contents

IPM Planning and Communication

Becker, B., 2000. Qualities to Look for in a Professional Pest Control Operator (PCO). Guidelines for  evaluating pest management professionals, including qualifications, services offered, IPM approach, use of pesticides, record keeping. Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/admn_con.htm.

Browner, C., 1993. Pest Control in the School Environment. US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C. 43 pp. Model IPM policy statement.

California Department of Pesticide Regulation. IPM Coordinator Job Description. Read description here.

Daar et al., 1997. Chapter 3. Setting injury and action thresholds, pp. 15-18; Appendix A. IPM-related curricula and resources for the classroom, pp. 157-158; Appendix B. How to develop an IPM program, pp. 159-167; Appendix C. Developing an IPM policy statement for school pest management, pp. 169-170; Appendix D. Integrated pest management (IPM) contract performance specifications, pp. 171- 175. In IPM for Schools: A How-to Manual. Setting action thresholds; descriptions and contact information for IPM-related games, projects and curriculum guides; pest management roles; model IPM policy statement; model pest control service contract specifications. Available at http://www.birc.org/schoolmanual.htm.

Illinois EPA.  2003. Green Schools Checklist: Environmental Actions for Schools to Consider. 24-page checklist includes sections entitled management strategies, energy use, indoor air quality, solid waste, hazardous material, mercury use, laboratory waste, mold growth, water consumption, building construction and renovation, purchasing, pest management, groundskeeping, and food service. Available in PDF form at http://www.azdeq.gov/function/about/download/greencheck.pdf.

Illinois State Board of Education. 2000. Integrated Pest Management and Notification Handbook.  38 pp. Model documents: IPM policy statement, contract specifications, inspection checklist, pest sighting log, trap/bait monitoring form, application notification form; summary and text of IL state laws; guidelines for pest tolerance levels. Available 
at http://www.isbe.net/construction/pdf/IPM.PDF.

Koehler et al., 1999. School IPM Web Site. University of Florida. Model IPM policy statement; model pest control service contract specifications; model IPM training and workshop agendas; model pest sightings log; model intent to apply pesticides noticesetting action thresholds; links to national and state resources for IPM in schools and IPM-related curricula resources. Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/.

Krieger, R. 2000. Policing Pests: Why Boards Need Pest-Management Policies. American School Board Journal. Vol 187. pp. 52-54. Article divided into three sections: "Educating the Community", "Alternatives to Pesticides" and "What Parents Need to Know."  "Educating the Community" advocates developing a school plan to let parents know schools are using pesticides responsibly. "Alternatives to Pesticides" recommends IPM as a strategy for schools to use.  "What Parents Need to Know" talks about IPM policy and keeping parents involved.  Insert entitled "Schools Curtail Pesticide Use" briefly discusses LAUSD use of IPM. 

Legal Environmental Assistance Foundation Inc., 1998. Community Action to Manage Pesticide Use in Schools (Campus): A Georgia Guide. 70 pp. Summary of pesticide and pest control regulations and policies; model IPM policies; step-by-step guide to establishing an IPM program in schools; model job descriptions for IPM committees and IPM coordinators; model facilities survey form; model IPM service log, pest report log, pesticide application logs. Available from LEAF, 1114 Thomasville Rd., Suite E, Tallahassee FL 32303-6290, (850) 681-2591, Fax (850) 224-1275. Email, Website: http://www.leaf-envirolaw.org.

Maine School Integrated Pest Management Program. Sample School Integrated Pest Management Plan. Sample IPM plan including policy language, inspection and monitoring schedules, pesticide use statement, etc. http://www.state.me.us/agriculture/pesticides/schoolipm/pdf/plan.pdf

Maine School Integrated Pest Management Program. A Model Integrated Pest Management Policy Statement for Maine Schools. 2-page document includes 
thoughts on IPM techniques, pest management objectives, the IPM coordinator, record keeping, notification and posting, pesticide storage and purchase and pesticide applicators.
Available in Word or PDF format at http://www.state.me.us/agriculture/pesticides/schoolipm/.

Maine School IPM Program.  Suggested [ Pest ] Notification Template.  Document in the form of a letter to parent, guardian or staff form the school available with or without registry option for parents. Available in PDF or Word format at http://www.state.me.us/agriculture/pesticides/schoolipm/.

Maryland Department of Agriculture. Action Thresholds in School IPM Programs. Pesticide Regulation Section, Annapolis, MD. 10 pp. Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/tp.htm.

Merchant and Merchant, 1997. The ABC's of IPM Video Series: Module 1. An 
Introduction; Module 4. Bids and Contracts; Module 5. The Administrative Challenge. Available from Distribution and Supply Office,
Texas Agricultural Extension Service, P.O. Box 1209, Bryan TX 77806-1209. (979) 845-6571, FAX (979) 862-1566.

Mertz, et al. Maryland Department of Agriculture, Pesticide Regulation Section publishes report entitled Contracting Guidelines for IPM Services in Maryland Public SchoolsIncludes an introduction to IPM in schools, general contracting components of IPM in schools, and general information on pest control, program reporting, evaluating and training. Also includes a synopsis of
Maryland Pesticide Applicators Law and Regulations. Available in PDF form at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/admn_con.htm.

Minnesota Department of Health, 2000. Model Pesticide Notice. Model notices to parents and school employees of pesticide applications, conforming to requirements of MN State law. Available at http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/pesticide/notices/index.html.

NC State University and NC A & T State University Cooperative Extension.  2002. IPM for North Carolina Schools. This 49-page document is divided into six parts: 1. What is IPM? 2. Adopting and IPM Program 3. Implementing a School IPM Program 4. Sample Forms 5. How to Develop Bid Invitations for IPM Service in Schools and 6. Resources. Available in PDF form at http://ipm.ncsu.edu/urban/cropsci/SchoolIPM/ schoolipm_manual.pdf .

Nagy, J. 2000. ESchool News Online. "School Pesticide Question Challenges Policymakers." Discusses federal and state's school pesticide legislation, as well as adjustments to local school district policy.  

Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides, 1994. Model IPM policy statement. Available at http://www.pesticide.org/default.htm.

Natural Resource, Agriculture, and Engineering Service (NRAES), 2002.  Integrated Pest Management for Northeast Schools. Introduction that answers the questions What is IPM? and Why Practice IPM in Schools?; Chapter on the Components of an IPM Program; Chapter on Establishing an IPM Program in Your School; Chapter on Managing Pests Found in Northeast Schools including a detailed list of common pests.  Also includes appendices on School IPM Checklist, Examples of Action Thresholds and General Recommendations for Pesticide Applications. Available from NRAES, Cooperative Extension, 152 Riley-Robb Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701. For more information, contact NRAES by phone at 607-255-7654 or fax at 607-254-8770 or email.

Pennsylvania State University IPM Program.  Site has many school IPM resources including a Ten Commandments of IPM for the Classroom and a how-to manual for Pennsylvania schools. Go to http://paipm.cas.psu.edu/pubs.html for more.

President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children. 2003. Inventory of Federal School Environmental Health Activities.  Inventory systematically lists all federal agencies' school environmental health programs. Includes the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Labor, Interior as well as extensive lists of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's current projects and resources.  In PDF at http://yosemite.epa.gov/ochp/ochpweb.nsf/content/Inventory.htm/ $file/Inventory.pdf. Also available in HTML version at http://yosemite.epa.gov/ochp/ochpweb.nsf/content/whatwe_tf_proj.htm.

Safer Pest Control Project. Model IPM policy statement conforming with IL State Law; "Cost of IPM in Schools, " two-page fact sheet in PDF format includes cost comparisons from school systems; "Guidelines for IPM in School Pest Management Contracts," one-page PDF fact sheet designed to help schools incorporate IPM into existing contracts with pest management professionals; pesticide application notification guidelines and model language. Available at http://www.spcpweb.org/.

Safer Pest Control Project. Integrated Pest Management in Schools: A Better Method. This 12-minute video is aimed at helping schools, parents, pest control operators, and other groups understand and promote School IPM. Filmed at a Chicago-area school that has practiced IPM since 1994, it features testimony and advice from the school's pest control operator and operations manager. It addresses concerns about pesticide use, the advantages of practicing IPM, and the basic components of IPM. For more information, go to http://www.spcpweb.org/attachments/ipmvideoColor3.pdf or call Safer Pest Control Project at (312) 641-5575.

Stauffer et al., 1998. Chapter 3.0. Administration of an IPM program. Pp. 3-1 to 3-26 In IPM Workbook for New York State Schools. IPM policy statements, roles, education and training, record keeping, notification, model bid specifications, model rating system for evaluating pest control bids. Available at http://www.nysipm.cornell.edu/publications/school_wkbk/files/schoolwkbk.pdf.

"Sustainable Schools Minnesota: High Performance Schools for Higher Performing Students." 2000. LHB Engineers and Architects, Factor 10, LLC, Intep/AW Consulting, and Elk River Area School DistrictFunded by the MN Office of Environmental Assistance, this free 56-page document is aimed at school board members and other decision-makers involved in the design, construction, and management of schools, and aims to help them with pre-design decisions that can lead to higher performing schools and students.  Sections of this report include: Introduction: Schools as Symbols, Highlights of High Performance School Design, Financial Implications of High Performance Schools, Process Overview, Components of High Performance School Design, and Case Examples. Free copies of the report are available from the OEA's Education Clearinghouse at (651) 215-0232 or (800) 877-6300 or via email.

Texas
Cooperative Extension. Model IPM Policy Statement. Includes definitions, development of IPM plans, essential IPM principles, pesticides use is school facilities, cooperation with IPM coordinator, contractual agreements with IPM providers, facilities planning, cooperation with regulatory agencies, and licensing and training for pesticide applicators. Available at http://schoolipm.tamu.edu/resources/documents/model_policy_statment.pdf

Texas Structural Pest Control Board. Revised 2001. Pest Control in the School Environment: Adopting Integrated Pest Management. Explains IPM, IPM policy, pesticide classification, how to establish an IPM program for schools, and elements of bid specifications. Available at http://www.spcbtx.org/ipm/Texas%20Adopt%20IPM.htm

US EPA.  2002.  EPA Guide to Protecting Children's Health in Schools. The US EPA has created an online or downloadable guide to identifying potential hazards in schools. The guide includes planning tools, a virtual tour of a school to help identify hazards, a section on case studies as well as a list of resources and contacts. Available at http://www.epa.gov/seahome/child.html.

US General Services Agency, 1999. Contract Guide Specifications for Integrated
Pest Management Programs in Government Buildings and Schools. 7 pp. Suggested guidelines for use when contracting with a pest management professional for services, including inspection, IPM plan, use of pesticides, recordkeeping. Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/admn_con.htm.

University of Florida. 2001.  Intent to Apply Pesticides document. One page model of intent to apply form. Available in PDF version at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/doc/Apply.pdf.

University of Florida. 2001.  School IPM Model Contract. Extensive outline designed to be used by officials working in schools, such as purchasing agents, who are responsible for procuring pest management services.  Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/doc/model_contract.htm.

Vermont School IPM.  2002.  Sample School IPM Plan, Draft School IPM Policy Statement for Vermont Schools, Draft Notification and Registry Letter for parents, staff and faculty, Draft Notification Letter for parents, staff and faculty, Pest Reporting Forms, Pest Sighting Log and Pesticide Use Log all available on the Vermont School IPM website, http://pss.uvm.edu/pd/schoolipm/.

Washington Toxics Coalition.  2001.  Model Least Toxic IPM Policy. Includes sections entitled Pesticide Use and Selection, Notification and Timing, Recordkeeping, Pest Management Committee, Progress Review, Right to Appeal, and Identification and Notification of Sensitive Individuals. Available at http://www.watoxics.org/content/pdf/IPMPolicy.pdf.

West Virginia Dept. of Agriculture, 1999. Integrated Pest Management in Schools and Other Public Institutions: Best Management Practices. Model IPM policy, setting action thresholds, vendor evaluation criteria and contracts. Available from the WV Dept. of Agriculture, 1900 Kanawha Boulevard E., Charleston WV 25305-0170.

Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. 2003.  Frequently Asked Questions About School IPM Pesticide Use on Public School Grounds. Includes sections entitled definitions, pesticides use requirements, applicability of pesticide use law, responsibilities of the school board and pesticide applicator, product labels, exemptions from the law, certification categories, licensing of certified applicators, hiring a commercial applicator, warning signs, and record keeping.  Available at http://www.datcp.state.wi.us/arm/agriculture/pest-fert/pesticides/pdf/IPM_FAQ_revised_
October_2003.pdf
.

Williams, G.M., H. M. Linker, M.G. Waldvogel, R.B. Leidy and C. Schal.  2005.  Comparison between conventional and Integrated Pest Management Programs in public schools.  J. Econ. Entomol. 98(4): 1275-1283.  Cost to deliver IPM was similar to conventional and pest control was equivalent, with less pesticide used and fewer pesticide residues present in the IPM school.  PDF.

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Inspection, Sanitation and Exclusion

Daar et al., 1997. Appendix E. Sample monitoring forms, pp. 177-194; Appendix F. How to collect and preserve specimens for identification, pp. 195-196; Appendix I. Inspection checklist for detecting structural decay and structural pest damage, pp. 209-213. In IPM for Schools: A How-to Manual. Model monitoring forms for roach traps and landscapes, model pest control trouble call log; collecting pest and plant specimens; locations and features to inspect in and around structures with detailed instructions. Available at http://www.birc.org/schoolmanual.htm.

Fournier. 2001. IPM Inspections Web Site. Purdue UniversityPest vulnerable areas, Tools and Access, Inspection Questions, Recommendations, Inspection Forms and Checklists, and IPM Inspection of School Grounds.  Index and PDF version available at http://www.entm.purdue.edu/entomology/ outreach/ choolipm/1pmp/pmpins.htm.
    
Koehler et al., 1999. School IPM Web Site.
University of Florida. Model cafeteria inspection checklistimportance of sanitation. Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/ index.html.

NC State University and NC A & T State University Cooperative Extension.  2002. IPM for North Carolina Schools. This 49-page document is divided into six parts: 1. What is IPM? 2. Adopting and IPM Program 3. Implementing a School IPM Program 4. Sample Forms 5. How to Develop Bid Invitations for IPM Service in Schools and 6. Resources.  Available in PDF form at http://ipm.ncsu.edu/urban/cropsci/SchoolIPM/ schoolipm_manual.pdf.

NC State University, Michael Waldvogel.  2003. IPM in Schools PowerPoint.  Includes slides on SEPA, inspection and exculsion, roach management, mice management, fly management, and ant management. Available online at http://ipm.ncsu.edu/urban/cropsci/SchoolIPM/presentations.html.

Smith-Fiola, D. ed., 2000. Landscape Integrated
Pest Management: An Alternative Approach to Traditional Landscape Maintenance. Sixth Edition. 259 pp. Basic and advanced monitoring methods, record keeping, site mapping, equipment. Available from Publications Distribution Center, Cook College, Rutgers University, 57 Dudley Road, New Brunswick NJ 08901-8520. (732) 932-9762, Web site http://www.rce.rutgers.edu/.

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Pest and Pesticide Risk Management

American School and University.  1999. "A Bug's Life." Explains the use of integrated pest management (IPM) to help make schools safer and provide a healthier environment for students and staff. Cost considerations when implementing an IPM are discussed as are key factors in establishing a program. Available at http://asumag.com/mag/university_bugs_life/

Ard, J. IPM Associates, Inc. "Fundamentals of a Low Maintenance, Integrated Pest Management Approach to Landscape Design." Published on the Integrated Pest Management Practitioners Association Web site, this article discusses the design/maintenance interface; key considerations for low maintenance IPM-based landscape designs, and construction practices.  Available at http://www.efn.org/~ipmpa/des-cnsd.html.

Attorney General of New York, New York State Dept. of Law, and Environmental Protection Bureau.  1996.  Pesticides in Schools: Reducing the Risks. Based on concerns that children and staff may be unnecessarily and unwittingly exposed to pesticides in their schools, the New York Attorney General's Office initiated a state-wide study of pesticide use in New York State in the public schools. This report describes this state-wide survey, provides information about some of the potential dangers of these chemicals, and recommends steps that schools and communities can take to minimize pesticide use. 33p.  Available on http://www.oag.state.ny.us/environment/schools96.html.

Beyond Pesticides.  2000.  Health Effects of 48 Commonly Used Pesticides in Schools. 2-page chart summarizes the effects of 48 commonly used pesticides in schools on children's health. Available at http://www.beyondpesticides.org/schools/publications/48%20School%20Pesticides.pdf.

Beyond Pesticides.  2002.  Ten Myths Behind Pesticide-Dependent Pest Management in Schools. 4-page fact sheet that "debunks opponents to school integrated pest management, pesticide bans and notification programs."  Available at http://www.beyondpesticides.org/schools/publications/Ten_Myths.pdf.

Bio-Integral Resource Center, 2000. Directory of Least-Toxic Pest Control Products. The IPM Practitioner 21: (11/12) 1-38. List of least-toxic controls by target pest, including insect, plant disease, weed and vertebrate pests; list of suppliers with contact information. Available from BIRC, PO Box 7414 , Berkeley CA 94707. (510) 524-2567, FAX (510) 524-1758, Email, Website http://www.birc.org.

Braness, G., 1997. Chapter 23. Insecticides used in pest control. Pp. 1061-1101. In Handbook of Pest Control, A. Mallis, ed. B&W photos, chemical classifications, mode of actions, formulations and table of insecticides with trade names, common names,
US
EPA signal word and uses. Available from GIE Media, (800) 456-0707 or from Amazon.com.

California State Parent Teacher Association Newsletter.  1998.  "Pesticides In Our Schools." Newsletter discusses use of pesticides on school grounds, parking lots, tracks, play areas, cafeterias, classrooms, gymnasiums and rest rooms, causing acute and chronic health problems.  

City of Seattle, 1999. Pesticide Use Reduction Strategy. Model pesticide use and risk reduction strategy. Available at http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/environment/pesticides.htm.

Cleaning and Maintenance Management Online.  2000. "EPA Encourages Schools to Adopt Pest-Control Option." The Environmental Protection Agency says school administrators and facility managers who make pest control decisions for school buildings and grounds should become aware of the pest control options available to them. Schools across the nation adopting such programs have reported successful, cost-effective conversion to IPM, which can reduce the use of chemicals and provide economical and effective pest suppression. Available at http://www.facility-maintenance.com/ article.asp?IndexID=6630599.

Daar et al., 1997. Appendix G. Pesticide information resources. Pp. 197-198. In IPM for Schools: A How-to Manual. Contact information for non-governmental sources of information on pesticides and pesticide risk management. Available at http://www.birc.org/schoolmanual.htm.

Dahlgren, S.  2000.  Athletic Business.  "Fowl Play." Discusses ways some 
universities have dealt with eliminating insects and wildlife from their athletic fields, the types of problems to look for, the damage pests can cause, the safety issues involved, and tips on remedies are examined.
  Available at http://www.athleticbusiness.com/files/AB-0100-62.pdf.

Dame, D.A. and T.R. Fasulo, eds., 2000. Safe Use of Pesticides. 38 pp.   Public health issues, pesticide toxicology, classifications, labels, spill handling, fire prevention and fighting. Available at http://vector.ifas.ufl.edu/manual.htm.

Green, S. G., 1997. Chapter 28. Itches, illusions and phobias. Pp. 1271-1323. In Handbook of Pest Control, A. Mallis, ed. Potential causes of itching and rashes, including insects, mites and causes unrelated to pests; chemical sensitivity. Available from GIE Media, (800) 456-0707 or from Amazon.com.

Healthy Schools Network, Inc.  1999.  Children, Learning, and Poisons Don't Mix: Kick the Pesticide Habit. This 8-page brochure examines basic information about pesticides and their use in and around schools, how children are exposed to pesticides and their health effects, and how a school can kick the habit of using pesticides. To order, write Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208; Tel: 518-462-0632, ERIC NO: ED447680.

James, A.  2000.  School Planning and Management.  "Keep Pests from Becoming a Problem in Your School." Examines the use of pesticides in an integrated pest management (IPM) program. The three steps to creating an IPM are discussed along with IPM personnel communication requirements and the need for written policies managed by a knowledgeable coordinator. 

Mueller, D. K., 1997. Chapter 24. Fumigation. Pp. 1103-1152. In Handbook of Pest  Control, A. Mallis, ed. B&W photos, line drawings, mode of action, safety, heat treatment. Available from GIE Media, (800) 456-0707 or from Amazon.com.

Nalyanya, G., J.C. Gore, H.M. Linker and C. Schal.  2009.  German cockroach allergen levels in North Carolina Schools: Comparison of Integrated Pest Management and conventional cockroach control. J. Med. Entomol.  46(3): 420-427.

National Environmental Education & Training Foundation.  2003.   National pesticide practice skills guidelines for medical & nursing practice. The National Environmental Education & Training Foundation (NEETF), in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the U.S. Department of Labor, has published guidelines that will serve as tools for focusing schools and practicum programs on pesticide health education, provide guidance directly to nurses and physicians  to advance their awareness and skill in recognizing and managing pesticide-related illness, and act as a model for faculty and administrators in integrating specific pesticide issues into education and training.  These documents can be viewed and downloaded at http://www.guideline.gov/summary/summary.aspx?ss=15&doc_id=4993&nbr=3533.  Paper copies will be available later this year.  For more information, contact: The National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, National Strategies for Health Care Providers: Pesticides Initiative; 1707 H Street, NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC, 20006-3915; 202-833-2933 x 535.

National Pesticide Telecommunications Network. Toll-free telephone service provides pesticide information, fact sheets on pesticides and anti-microbials. (800) 858-7378. More at http://ace.orst.edu/info/nptn/index.html.

Natural Resource, Agriculture, and Engineering Service (NRAES), 2002.  Integrated Pest  Management for Northeast Schools. Introduction that answers the questions What is IPM? and Why Practice IPM in Schools?; Chapter on the Components of an IPM Program; Chapter on Establishing an IPM Program in Your School; Chapter on Managing Pests Found in Northeast Schools including a detailed list of common pests.  Also includes appendices on School IPM Checklist, Examples of Action Thresholds and General Recommendations for Pesticide Applications. Available from NRAES, Cooperative Extension, 152 Riley-Robb Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701.  For more information, contact NRAES by phone at 607-255-7654 or fax at 607-254-8770 or email.

Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides, 1999. School Pesticide Use Reduction Program. Fact sheets on pesticides and alternatives to pesticides, Journal of Pesticide Reform quarterly newsletter. Available at http://www.pesticide.org/default.htm.

Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides. 2000.  Unintended Casualties: Five Stories of Children Whose Lives Were Profoundly Affected by Exposure to Pesticides at School. This 5-page supplementary packet highlights five school pesticide exposure incidents and personalizes them in a way not possible in the Appendix of the larger report. Available at http://www.pesticide.org/ UnthinkableRisk.html.

Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides.  2000.  Unthinkable Risk: How Children are Exposed and Harmed When Pesticides are Used at School.  50-page report includes a Summary and Introduction, Pesticide Contamination of Indoor Air and Surfaces, Pesticide Contamination of Soil, Vegetation, Turf, and the Outdoor Environment, Breathing, Touching, Tasting: How Children can Inhale, Absorb, or Ingest Pesticide Residues and Vapors, Learning the Hard Way: Actual School Pesticide Exposure Incidents, Recommendations for Parents, Schools, States, and the Federal Government, References, List of School Pesticide Exposure Incidents, California Incidents, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington Incidents, and Incidents in Other StatesAvailable at http://www.pesticide.org/ UnthinkableRisk.html.

Pesticide Action Network. 2000.  PAN Pesticide Database. Comprehensive online database on the health hazards of more than 5,100 ingredients in pesticides including whether a pesticide is a carcinogen, a reproductive or developmental toxicant or causes other harm to health and which chemicals pollute ground water or kill aquatic wildlife. Sources include the World Health Organization, National Institutes of Health, National Toxicology Program, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and independent published 
and peer-reviewed research. 
Available at http://www.pesticideinfo.org.

Ross, Z and Walker, B.  1998.  An Ill Wind: Methyl Bromide Use Near California Schools. The Environmental Working Group provides a 40-page California study that examines the use of methyl bromide near public schools.  Available at http://www.ewg.org/reports/an_ill_wind/pressrelease.html or, to order, write the Environmental Working Group, 1718 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20009; Tel: 202-667-6982.

Rutgers Cooperative Extension.  2003. IPM Report Card for School Grounds.  Report cards provide a series of self-assessment tools that will allow schools to measure their adoption of IPM on school grounds.  There are five report cards divided into the following categories: General Requirements, Athletic Fields, Turf, Ornamental Plants and Landscape Plantings. Available at http://www.pestmanagement.rutgers.edu/IPM/ SchoolIPM/reportcard.html.

Safer Pest Control Project.  2-page fact sheet entitled Pesticides in Schools: What are the Health Risks? Includes information on health risks, cancer and asthma, and IPM as a possible solution. Available at http://www.spcpweb.org/schheal.pdf.

Stauffer et al., 1998. Safety precautions and personal protection for the applicator and worker. Pp. 6-1 to 6-16. In IPM Workbook for New York State Schools. Protective equipment and clothing for pesticide applicators; pesticide transport, handling, storage, application and cleanup safety. Available at http://www.nysipm.cornell.edu/ publications/schoolwkbk.pdf.

Texas, State of, 1999. Integrated pest management in schools. Structural Pest Control Board. Red/Yellow/Green pesticide risk ranking system. Available at http://www.spcb.state.tx.us/ipm/ipmindex.htm.

Tucker, J.B., 1997. Chapter 29. Sensitive environments. Pp. 1325-1366. In Handbook of Pest Control, A. Mallis, ed. Pest management principles and strategies for sensitive environments including schools. Available from GIE Media, (800) 456-0707 or from Amazon.com.

United States Poison Control Center Central Hotline. Officials launched the national hotline, 1-800-222-1222, and applauded it as an overdue coordination of the country's 65 separately-run poison centers. Callers dialing the number will be automatically linked to the closest poison center.  

United States Senate.  1999.  Pesticides: Use, Effects, and Alternatives to Pesticides in Schools. Report to the Ranking Minority Member, Committee on Governmental Affairs. The 18-page report addresses the following questions: 1) what federal requirements govern the use of pesticides in schools? 2) what information exists on the use of pesticides in schools? 3) what data exist on the incidences of short and long term illnesses linked to exposure to pesticides in schools? 4) are the EPA and the states taking actions, where appropriate, to reduce the use of pesticides in schools, and if so, what are the results of these efforts?  Available at http://www.gao.gov/archive/2000/rc00017.pdf or, to order a hard copy, contact the U.S. General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 37050, Washington, DC 20013; Tel: 202-512-6000.  Report NO: GAO/RCED-00-17.

University of Florida. 2001. IPM Cafeteria Inspection Checklist. A model IPM cafeteria inspection checklist for schools. Available in PDF version at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/doc/cafe2.pdf.  

University of Maryland.  Pesticide Information Leaflet Series. Series of 29 downloadable leaflets in pdf format including insect repellant safety, pesticide safe use checklist, protecting ground water, pesticides associated with skin diseases, reading pesticide labels, multiple chemical sensitivity, pesticides and cancer, pesticides and the endocrine system. Available at http://www.entmclasses.umd.edu/PeapPubs/LeafletList.jsp

University of Nebraska.  Pesticide applicator training manuals. Includes Applying Pesticides Correctly, Private Applicator Self-Study Manual, and a series of category manuals including aerial, agricultural, aquatic, ornamentals, structural, etc.  Manuals include self-study guides and tests.  http://pested.unl.edu/training.htm.

Back to Links & Resources - Contents

General Resources for School IPM

Arguello, M., Campbell, K., Kegley, S., Ille, T., Porter, C., Undem, M.  2001.  Healthy Schools Campaign Pesticide Action Kit. This English/Spanish informational kit contains resource materials that school administrators and parents can use to help them eliminate hazardous pesticide use around their schools.  The kit looks at how to organize community interest in least-toxic Integrated Pest Management policy, and it presents resources on the toxicity and health impacts of pesticides applied in schools. The kit's informational sheets are entitled as follows: "What is the Healthy Schools Act?;" "Ten Steps to a Healthy  School;" "Notification: Your Right to Know;" "Kids at Risk: Pesticides & Children's Health;" "What Are the Alternatives;" "Hazards of Common Pesticides;" and "Pesticide Information Online." A sample school policy and a resource list are included. 20p.  To order, write Californians for Pesticide Reform, 49 Powell Street, Suite 530, San Francisco, CA 94102. Tel: 1-415-981-3939.

Becker, B., E. Bergman, N. Zuelsdorff, K. Fenster, B. Swingle and J. Larson. 1998. Final Report on Pesticide Use in Wisconsin Schools. Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, Madison WI.

Benbrook, C. M., E. Groth, J. M. Halloran, M. K. Hansen and S. Marquardt. 1996.
Pest Management at the Crossroads. 272 pp. Consumers Union, Yonkers NY. ISBN 0-89043-900-1.

Boise
, P., and K. Feeney. 1999. Reducing Pesticides in Schools: How Two Elementary Schools Control Common Pests Using Integrated Pest Management Strategies. S. Wright, ed. Community Environmental Council, Santa Barbara CA. To request a copy, contact 930 Miramonte Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109, Phone: (805) 963-0583, Fax: (805) 962-9080, Email.

Browner, C. 1993. Pest Control in the School Environment. 43 pp. US
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington D.C.

Cacek, T., ed. 1998. The National Park Service Integrated
Pest Management Manual. National Park Service, Fort Collins CO. Available at http://www.nature.nps.gov/biology/ipm/manual/ipmmanual.pdf.

California Department of Pesticide Regulation.  2002.  School IPM Program Website.  Available at http://apps.cdpr.ca.gov/schoolipm/.

Childproofing our Communities Campaign.  2001.  Poisoned Schools: Invisible Threats, Visible Actions. 79 pp. Details risk of toxic contamination of school sites and of improper pesticide use in schools; presents specific recommendations for locating schools to avoid contaminated sites and for  implementing IPM in schools.  Includes a comprehensive "Gold Standard" for IPM in schools. Available in part at http://www.childproofing.org/poisoned schoolsmain.html, and in print from Center for Health, Environment and Justice, P.O. Box 6806, Falls Church VA 22040, (703) 237-2249, Email.

City of Santa Monica CA. 1998. Custodial Products Bid Specifications. 6 pp. Available at http://pen1.santa-monica.org/environment/policy/purchasing/.

City of
Seattle. 1999. Pesticide Use Reduction Strategy. Available at http://www.ci.seattle.wa.us/environment/ pesticides.htm.

Daar, S., T. Drlik, H. Olkowski and W. Olkowski. 1997. IPM for Schools: A How-to Manual. US Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9, San Francisco CA. 213 pp. Available at http://www.birc.org/schoolmanual.htm.

Daar, S., and T. Drlik. 1997. IPM for school lawns. Common Sense
Pest Control Quarterly, 13(4):5-13. Available from the Bio-Integral Resource Center, Berkeley CA. (510) 524-2567. http://www.birc.org.

Dame, D.A. and T.R. Fasulo, eds., 2000. National Public Health
Pest Control Manual. Chapters currently available on pest and public health issues, safe use of pesticides, application equipment and flies. Available at http://vector.ifas.ufl.edu/manual.htm.

Dickey, P. 1998. Purchasing Environmentally Preferable Cleaning Products: A Critical Review of Programs. 88 pp. Available from
Washington
Toxics Coalition, Seattle WA. (206) 632-1545. http://www.watoxics.org.

Dreistadt, S.H., J.K. Clark and M.L. Flint. 1994. Pests of Landscape Trees and Shrubs. 328 pp. 
University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources Publication No. 3359. ISBN 1-879906-18-X. Color photos, line drawings, identification, biology, monitoring, management. Available from ANR Publications, 6701 San Pablo Ave., Oakland CA 94608-1239. (510) 642-2431,  FAX (510) 643-5470.

Fermanian, T.W., M.C. Shurtleff, R. Randell, H.T. Wilkinson and P.L. Nixon. 1997. Controlling Turfgrass Pests. 2nd ed. Prentice Hall,
Upper Saddle River
NJ. ISBN 0-13-462433-5.

Flint, M.L., ed. 2000. Pests of Home and Landscape. University of California Statewide IPM Project. Available at http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/ selectnewpest.home.html.

Hawkins, B. L. 2001. Facilities Design & Management. "The Minds Behind the Schools." Highlights three individuals whose ideas have contributed to some groundbreaking educational facilities. Two individuals have developed schools that are centers of their communities while the third is expert at designing integrated pest management systems.  

Hedges, S. A. 1992. Field Guide for the Management of Structure-Infesting Ants. 155 pp. Franzak & Foster Co.,
Cleveland OH. (216) 961-4130.

Hollingsworth, C.S. (Ed.). 2000. Integrated
Pest Management Guidelines for Structural Pests: Model Guidelines for Training and Implementation. 58 pp. Describes practices that should be used by professional pest control practitioners who wish to be identified as IPM practitioners, but can also be used by homeowners for implementing their own IPM program to control pests such as ants, cockroaches, fleas, flies, rodents and subterranean termites. Available from Extension Bookstore, Draper Hall, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts01003. Phone 413-545-0111, Email, Web site http://www.umass.edu/umext/bookstore/ index.html.

Illinois EPA. 2003.  Green Schools Checklist: Environmental Actions for  Schools to Consider. 24-page checklist includes sections entitled management strategies, energy use, indoor air quality, solid waste, hazardous material, mercury use, laboratory waste, mold growth, water consumption, building construction and renovation, purchasing, pest management, groundskeeping, and food service. Available in PDF form at http://www.epa.state.il.us/ green-illinois/green-schools/green-schools-checklist.pdf

Illinois Department of Public Health. 1999.  A Practical Guide to management of Common Pests in Schools. 3-part guide designed to assist Illinois school officials. Part One gives a definition of IPM.  Part Two includes five steps in how to build an IPM program. Part Three provides pest-specific IPM practices for schools. Available at http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/pdf/schoolpests.pdf

Jochim, J.  2003.  Pesticides and You.  "Inspect, Detect, Correct: Structural 
Integrated"
Pest Management Strategies at School." Describes a model integrated pest management (IPM) program for schools used in Monroe County, Indiana. Addresses how to implement an IPM program, specific school problem areas, specific pest problems and solutions, and common questions.  

Koehler, P., T. Fasulo, C. Scherer and M. Downey, Eds. 1999. School IPM Website. 
University of Florida. Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/.

Loudon, E. 1999. Weed Wars: Pesticide Use in Washington Schools.
Washington Toxics Coalition, Seattle WA. 40 pp.  Available from Washington Toxics Coalition, Seattle WA. (206) 632-1545. http://www.watoxics.org

Mage, D., Gondy, G., & Yimesghen, G., 2002.  Pesticides in Schools: Planning for a Feasibility Study to Determine the Need for A Full-Scale National Study. Temple University Institute for Survey Research. A contracted report regarding the need for a full-scale pesticides in schools study by the US EPA.  36-page report includes Introduction & Background, Elements, Definitions, Summary,  Response Rates, the Pre-Pilot Study, Design Effect, Need for a Pilot Study, Conceptualization of the National Study, Statistical Analyses, Budgetary  Analysis, Summary & Conclusion, References as well as appendices. To request, contact US EPA or Institute for Survey Research, 1601 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122-6099.

Maine Cooperative Extension. 2002.  Integrated Pest Management for Maine 
Schools. 146-page document with 13 informative chapters: 1. Organizing a School IPM Program, 2. IPM on School Grounds, 3. Landscape Management, 4. Turfgrass Management, 5. Insect Pests of Turfgrass, 6. Turfgrass Diseases, 7. Weeds, 8. Spiders, 9. Wasps & Bees, 10. Flies & Mosquitoes, 11. Ants, 12. Vertebrate Pests, 13. Outdoor IPM for Maine Schools.  Available in PDF format or for order at http://www.state.me.us/agriculture/pesticides/schoolipm/.  

Maine School IPM Program. PowerPoint presentations for school IPM. Maine  
School IPM Program provides two valuable PowerPoint presentations for school IPM entitled "Maine School IPM" and "Pesticide Application Rules for Schools in Maine." Available at http://www.state.me.us/agriculture/pesticides/ schoolipm/.

Maryland Department of Agriculture. Regulations Pertaining to Integrated
Pest  
Management and Notification of Pesticide Use in a Public School. Pesticide 
Regulation Section,
Annapolis MD. 9 pp.

Maryland Department of Agriculture. 1995. Contracting Guidelines for Integrated 
Pest Management Services in Maryland Public Schools. 75 pp.

Maryland Department of Agriculture. 1995. Guidelines for Integrated
Pest  
Management (IPM) in Schools. 9 pp.

Maryland Department of Agriculture. 1997. Summary of Structural
Pest Control  Programs and Implementation of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Maryland Public School Systems. 37 pp. 

Maryland Department of Agriculture. 1999. Integrated
Pest Management and Notification Requirements for Maryland Public Schools. Pesticide Regulation Section, Annapolis MD. 2 pp.

Merchant, H. F., and M. E. Merchant, 1997. The ABC's of IPM Video Series: Module 1, An Introduction; Module 2, Structural
Pest Control; Module 3, Food Handling Areas; Module 4, Bids and Contracts; Module 5, The Administrative Challenge. Available from Distribution and Supply Office, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, P.O. Box 1209, Bryan TX 77806-1209. (979) 845-6571, FAX (979) 862-1566.

Merchant, M. E. 1995.
Pest Control in Texas Schools. Texas Agricultural Extension Service, College Station TX. 58 pp.

Miller, N. L.  1995. The Healthy School Handbook. Conquering the Sick Building Syndrome and Other Environmental Hazards In and Around Your School. This book compiles 22 articles concerning sick building syndrome in educational facilities in the following three areas: determining whether a school is sick; assessing causes and initiating treatment; and developing interventions. Articles address such topics as managing the psycho-social aspects of sick building syndrome; how indoor air quality affects pre-existing health problems; adverse effects of artificial lighting on learning and behavior in children; the least toxic approaches to managing pests in schools; the multi-disciplinary approach to treating environmentally triggered illnesses in 
school-age children; the practical and cost-effective approaches to building, 
remodeling, and maintaining schools; and the legal aspects of pollution in schools. 446p.
To order, contact the National Education Association with ERIC NO: ED426579; ISBN-0-8106-1863-X.

Montana Department of Agriculture. 1994. The Montana Model School Integrated Pest and Pesticide  Management Program.

NC State University and NC A & T State University Cooperative Extension.  2002. IPM for North Carolina Schools. This 49-page document is divided into six parts: 1. What is IPM? 2. Adopting and IPM Program 3. Implementing a School IPM Program 4. Sample Forms 5. How to Develop Bid Invitations for IPM Service in Schools and 6. Resources. Available in PDF form at http://ipm.ncsu.edu/urban/cropsci/SchoolIPM/ schoolipm_manual.pdf

NC State University, Michael Waldvogel. 2003. IPM in Schools PowerPoint.  Includes slides on SEPA, inspection and exculsion, roach management, mice management, fly management, and ant management. Available online at http://ipm.ncsu.edu/urban/cropsci/SchoolIPM/presentations.html

National Foundation for IPM Education.  2002.  Proceedings: IPM in Schools Workshop, Crystal City
VA.
http://www.ipminstitute.org/pdf/IPMISProceedings 103102.pdf.

National School IPM Web site. The CD-ROM contains everything on the Web site including IPM information from IPM experts across the nation that is orientated to administrators, teachers, parents and pest management professionals. It also includes advice on how to develop an IPM program; alternative methods of pest control; information on pests and pesticides safety; news releases on IPM and pests for school newsletters; Powerpoint presentations on; sample contacts and letters; educational materials; links to school related Web site in numerous areas (organized by subject and location); and much more. The web site is now available complete on a CD-ROM for use in stand-alone or networking environments for both PCs and Macs.  Additional copies may be purchased by calling them at 800-226-1764.

Natural Resource, Agriculture and Engineering Service (NRAES).  2003.  Integrated Pest Management for Northeast Schools. 68 pp. Extensive document includes sections entitled "Components of an IPM Program," "Establishing an IPM Program for Your School," and "Managing Pests Found in Northeast Schools." Available for viewing only at http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/publications/ for_ viewing _only_ipmns.pdf.  

New Jersey Environmental Federation. 2003. Safe Pest Control for New Jersey Schools. 2-page brochure on IPM in schools including explanation on how IPM works in a school and a list on New Jersey schools currently using IPM.  http://www.cleanwateraction.org/files/publications/nj/greencleanpp.pdf.

Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides. 1999. School Pesticide Use Reduction Program. http://www.pesticide.org/default.htm.

Olkowski, W., S. Daar and H. Olkowski. 1991. Common-Sense
Pest Control: Least-Toxic Solutions for your Home, Garden, Pets and Community. Taunton Press, Newtown CT. 715 pp.

Pennsylvania IPM Program.  2002. IPM for Pennsylvania Schools: A How-To Manual. A packet of helpful information to aid schools in implementing an IPM plan according to new PA legislation sent out to administrators across  Pennsylvania from the PA IPM Program.  Available in three PDF parts, including a letter of explanation, copy of the legislation (Acts 35 and 36), Sample Pest Control Information Sheet, Sample Notice of Pesticide Application, Sample Notification Letter for Parents, How to Develop an IPM Policy and Plan, Sample IPM Plan and Updated IPM Policy from PA IPM and PSBA. Available at http://paipm.cas.psu.edu/schools/school Mangm.htm#paipm.

Pennsylvania IPM Program. 2004. Pennsylvania School IPM Manual. New edition of the manual contains sections on mosquito and tick IPM as well as more references and information on new IPM legislation. The manual also includes chapters on suggestions for setting up an IPM program in schools and developing an IPM policy and a sample policy from the Pennsylvania School Boards Association.  Additionally, the manual contains a listing of commonly encountered pests in and around schools as well as information on the biology, identification and management of various types of pests. Available for purchase through the Publications Distribution Center, Penn State University, 112 Agricultural Administration Bldg., University Park, PA. Call (877) 345-0691(toll free) to order by phone.

Pennsylvania State University. 1999. IPM in Schools. http://paipm.cas.psu.edu/schoolipm.html

Pinto, L. J., and S. K. Kraft. 1995. Integrated
Pest Management in Schools: IPM Training Manual. Maryland Department of Agriculture, Annapolis MD. 56 pp.

Pinto, L. J., and S. K. Kraft. 1997. IPM in Schools: A Practical Step-by-Step Guide. Maryland Department of Agriculture, Pesticide Regulation Section,
Annapolis MD. Video tape and companion guides.

President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children.  2003.  Inventory of Federal School Environmental Health Activities.  Inventory systematically lists all federal agencies' school environmental health programs. Includes the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services, Labor, Interior as well as extensive lists of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's current projects and resources.  In PDF at http://yosemite.epa.gov/ochp/ochpweb.nsf/content/Inventory.htm/ $file/Inventory.pdf.  Also available in HTML version at http://yosemite.epa.gov/ ochp/ochpweb.nsf/content/whatwe_tf_proj.htm.

Raphael, D. 1999. Integrated
Pest Management Program Report: Pesticide List 2000. Department of the Environment, City and County of San Francisco CA. 28 pp.

Rutgers Cooperative Extension.  2003.  School IPM Resource Guide for New York and New Jersey39-page resource guide is separated into three sections: General Resources for School IPM & IPM, NJ Resources for School IPM and NY Resources for School IPM. Available at http://www.pestmanagement.rutgers.edu/IPM/SchoolIPM/ resources.html.

Safer Pest Control Project.  2001.  Video: Integrated Pest Management in Schools: A Better Method. Eleven minutes. Designed to help Illinois schools comply with the new state law requiring IPM. Includes overview of the law, IPM basics and referrals to additional IPM resources.  Version suitable to other states also available. Available from the Safer Pest Control Project, Chicago IL, (312) 641-5575. http://www.spcpweb.org

Safer Pest Control Project. Integrated Pest Management in Chicago Public Housing: Homer and Beyond. Available from the Safer Pest Control Project, Chicago IL, (312) 641-5575. http://www.spcpweb.org

Safer Pest Control Project. School IPM Factsheets. A collection of fact sheets on IPM basics, school and childcare IPM, and IPM for residential areas, lawns and parks. http://spcpweb.org/resources/index.php#factsheets

Smith, E.H. and R.C. Whitman, 1999. NPMA Field Guide to Structural Pests. 800 pp. Color and B & W photos, detailed pest control operator-oriented information on 203 pests, including common and scientific names, biology, color photos and detailed information on how to recognize each pest, suggestions on similar pests, and management information. Available from National Pest Management Association Inc.,
8100 Oak Street, Dunn Loring
 
VA 22027. (703) 573-8330, FAX (703) 573-4116, Website http://www.pestworld.org/

Smith-Fiola, D. ed., 2000. Landscape Integrated
Pest Management: An Alternative Approach to Traditional Landscape Maintenance. Sixth Edition. Available from Publications Distribution Center, Cook College, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 57 Dudley Road, New Brunswick NJ 08901-8520. (732) 932-9762, Website http://www.rce.rutgers.edu.

Stauffer, S., R. Ferrentino, C. Koplinka-Loehr, K. Sharpe and L. Braband. 1998. IPM Workbook for New York State Schools. IPM Publication No. 605 8/98 1M WP, Cornell Cooperative Extension Community IPM Program,
Geneva NY. 155 pp. Available at http://www.nysipm.cornell.edu/publications/schoolwkbk.pdf.

Texas
, State of. 1999. Integrated pest management in schools. Structural Pest Control Board. Website, http://www.spcb.state.tx.us/ipm/ipmindex.htm.

University of California Statewide IPM Program. IPM In Schools Training DVDs. Available online for purchase at http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/IPMPROJECT/ADS/dvd_ipmschools.html.

University of Florida Department of Entomology and Nematology, 2000. Best of the Bugs Web Site. List of top web sites covering insects, mites and nematodes, including sites with teaching curricula. http://pests.ifas.ufl.edu/bestbugs/

University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service. 1998. Integrated Pest  
Management in Schools: IPM Training Manual for Grounds Maintenance. Bulletin #358.
College Park MD. 157 pp. 

US
EPA.  2002. EPA Guide to Protecting Children's Health in Schools. The US EPA has created an online or downloadable guide to identifying potential hazards in schools.  The guide includes planning tools, a virtual tour of a school to help identify hazards, a section on case studies as well as a list of resources and contacts. Available at http://www.epa.gov/seahome/child.html.

US EPA. Integrated Pest Management in Schools Nationwide Directory. http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/ipm/.  

US EPA.  2002.  Healthy School Environments Web Portal. The Healthy School Environments web page is intended to serve as a portal to on-line resources to help facility managers, school administrators, architects, design engineers, school nurses, parents, teachers and staff address environmental health issues in schools. While the information is primarily intended to help improve the environment of school facilities, educational resources for students and teachers can also be found through the Healthy School Environments portal.  Visitors can browse resources by geographic area, or search all resources by entering specific keywords into the search box at the top of each page. Available at http://epa.gov/schools.

US EPA.  2002.  "Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Schools." Web page available from US EPA that provides information about IPM and pesticide use in schools. Available at http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/ipm.

US EPA. 2002. "Protecting Children in Schools from Pests and Pesticides." A new brochure on school IPM.  Copies of the brochure may be obtained by calling  1-800-490-9198 (EPA's National Service Center for Environmental Publications) and requesting document number EPA-735-F-02-014.

University of Florida.  2001.  School IPM Model Contract. Extensive outline designed to be used by officials working in schools, such as purchasing agents, who are responsible for procuring pest management services.  Available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/doc/model_contract.htm.

Vail, K. M. 1998. Suggested Guidelines for Managing Pests in Tennessee's Schools: Adopting Integrated Pest Management. University of Tennessee Agricultural Extension Service Publication No. PB1603, Knoxville TN. Available at http://web.utk.edu/~extepp/ipm/pb1603.pdf.

Vail, K. M. and J. L. Croker, eds. 1999. Integrated
Pest Management of Landscapes. University of Tennessee Agricultural Extension Service Publication No. PB1639. Available from Mail and Supply Office, University of Tennessee, Knoxville TN. (865) 974-7300, FAX (865) 974-2713.

Video Development Services, Inc. 1994.
Pest Control in the School Environment: Adopting IPM. Houston, TX. Videotape. 

Washington Toxics Coalition.  2001.  Model Least Toxic IPM Policy. Includes sections entitled Pesticide Use and Selection, Notification and Timing, Recordkeeping, Pest Management Committee, Progress Review, Right to Appeal, and Identification and Notification of Sensitive Individuals. Available at http://www.watoxics.org/content/pdf/IPMPolicy.pdf.

West Virginia Department of Agriculture. 1999. Integrated
Pest Management in Schools and Other Public Institutions: Best Management Practices. Available from the West Virginia Dept. of Agriculture, 1900 Kanawha Boulevard E., Charleston WV 25305-0170.

Back to Links & Resources - Contents

Resources for Child Care IPM

Iowa State University. Child Care IPM Training. a basic, online chemical safety training for child care providers. Nine modules are available; each is 15-20 minutes long. http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/childcare/detect

Pennsylvania Integrated Pest Management (PA IPM) Program. Child Care IPM Workshops. Modules are not currently online. IPM Centers can request a workshop. Open workshops are also sometimes scheduled. Contact Michelle Niedermeier at mxn14@psu.edu for more information.

Philip Smith, Compliance Assistance Specialist, West Virgina Department of Agriculture. One to two hour on-site workshops for schools and child care centers. Topics generally include IPM laws and principles. Contact Philip at psmith@ag.state.wv.us for more information.

Safer Pest Control Project, 2007. Survey of childcare providers and survey results.

Model Legislation

Arizona, State Legislature.  State laws for notification of school pesticides and pesticide applications at schools. Details pest management practices and pesticide application procedures at schools in ArizonaAvailable at http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ ars/15/00152.htm and http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ars/32/02307.htm.

Beyond Pesticides. 2002. Website includes list of state and local school pesticide policies including sections on Restricted Spray Zones Around School Property, and Integrated Pest Management. Available at http://www.beyondpesticides.org/schools/schoolpolicies/index.htm

CaliforniaPesticide & Toxic Chemical News, Vol. 30, No.14. The California Department of Pesticide Regulation has launched a new version of its School Integrated Pest Management Website, which includes a step-by-step checklist to help school officials determine when pesticide use must be reported and indicated by posted signs. It also contains links to databases and IPM resources. The address is http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/cfdocs/apps/schoolipm/ main.cfm.

CA Drift Around Schools Legislation -AB 947. 2002.  Assembly Bill 947 awaits Gov. Davis' signature. If signed into law, AB 947 would allow local agricultural authorities the ability to regulate ANY pesticides within 1/4 mile of schools.  This means that increased regulations and conditions could be put into place in order to prevent pesticide drift, or other pesticide-related accidents, around schools if local officials deem it necessary.  It would also increase the maximum fine for a serious violation from the current $1,000 to $5,000 and  
encourage schools to adopt pesticide emergency response plans.  This drafting of this bill was a result of a pesticide drift incident in
Ventura County in 2000 that caused students and staff to become ill after being exposed to Lorsban, a 'non-restricted' pesticide.  The chemical drifted from an adjacent orchard and resulted in exposure to teachers and children alike. Cuyama Elementary School in Santa Barbara County experienced a similar drift incident in 1999 that also resulted in the school being closed down after students and staff were exposed to metam sodium, a highly toxic, "restricted-use" material.  

California, State of.  2000. Assembly Bill 947. Proposed bill would require every school located within one quarter mile of agricultural land under production to create and maintain a safety plan that specifically addresses pesticide drift and accidental exposure to pesticides. County commissioners would be empowered to regulate use of pesticides near sensitive sites, including schools, and to levy penalties of up to $5000 for violations.  

California, State of. 2000.  An act to add Chapter 11 (commencing with Section 12420) to Division 6 of the Food and Agricultural Code, relating to pesticide regulation. Bill requires persons applying pesticides in schools to have annual training in pesticide safety and handling. Department of Pesticide Regulation is to prepare and distribute training materials to all school districts.  http://www.assembly.ca.gov/acs/ acsframeset2text.htm.

California, State of. 2000.  An act to add Section 48980.3 to, and to add Article 4 (commencing with Section 17608) to Chapter 5 of Part 10.5 of, the Education Code, and to add Article 17 (commencing with Section 13180) to Chapter 2 of Division 7 of the Food and Agricultural Code, relating to school safety. The "Healthy Schools Act of 2000" would require schools to employ "effective least toxic pest management practices;" maintain records of all pesticide use for 4 years and make the records available to the public upon request;  create a registry of those wishing to be notified of pesticide applications; provide written notification and posted warning signs of expected pesticide use.  The bill would also require that pest control operators include information on any school pesticide application that they perform as part of their pesticide use reporting requirements. http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/bill/asm/ab_2251-2300/ab_
2260_ bill_20000831_enrolled.html
.

Connecticut, State Legislature.  House Bill 99-165, An Act Concerning Notice of Pesticide Applications at Schools and Day Care CentersEnsures certification for pesticide applicators, written statement of the board's policy on pesticide application on school property and a description of any pesticide applications made at the school during the previous school year, written guidelines on how the integrated pest management plan is to be implemented, and restrictions on when spraying can be done. 

Connecticut, State Legislature. Senate Bill 1020, An Act Concerning Pesticide Applications At Child Day Care Centers And Schools. To provide that only a certified pesticide applicator may apply pesticide within a day care center, group day care home or family day care home, with an exemption for emergency applications, to expand the ban on pesticides on the grounds of day care centers to include family day cares where the licensee has ownership or control over the grounds, to require that the licensee notify parents when pesticide is applied pursuant to this section and to extend the exception to the ban on the application of pesticide on certain school grounds pursuant to an integrated pest management plan until July 1, 2010. http://www.cga.ct.gov/asp/cgabillstatus/cgabillstatus.asp?selBillType=Bill&bill_num=1020&which_year=2009

Delahaut, Karen. 2001. "Wisconsin's program for school pest management protects children." Over 67 percent of Wisconsin's schools have participated in Integrated Pest Management, or IPM programming in an effort to reduce health risks to children. A total of 1,395 schools had voluntarily participated in the program by August and new state legislation on pesticide use in schools was enacted in September. Available at http://www1.uwex.edu/news/story.cfm/433

Florida, State Board of Education.  Section 5.5 "Existing Facilities." Requires pest management programs in accordance with the EPA's Integrated Pest Management in Schools guidelines. Reference Pest Control in the School Environment: Adapting Integrated Pest Management (EPA Document 735-F-93-012, August 1993). Available in PDF format at http://www.fldoe.org/edfacil/pdf/srefvol1.pdf

Goldenberg, N., 1997. Chapter 27. Legislation, liability and litigation. Pp. 1249-1269. In Handbook of Pest Control, A. Mallis, ed. Federal legislation relating to pesticides and pesticide risks, reducing liability, handling claims. Available from GIE Media, (800) 456-0707 or from Amazon.com.

Illinois, state of. 2009. Public Act 096-0424. http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/publicacts/fulltext.asp?Name=096-0424

Illinois, State of. 2009. Senate Bill 1769. Pesticide and Lawn Care Product Application. http://ilga.gov/legislation/96/SB/PDF/09600SB1769lv.pdf

Illinois, State of.  2003.  Senate Bill 1079. SB1079 passed both the Illinois House and Senate unanimously. The bill now goes to the Governor for his signature. With this legislation in place, daycare centers in Illinois will be required to practice Integrated Pest Management and to notify parents 2 days prior to and not more than 30 days in advance of pesticide applications. 

Illinois, State of.  2000.  An Act to amend the Lawn Care Products Application and Notice Act. Includes notification provisions for pesticide applications on school grounds. Available at http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/publicacts/pubact91/acts/91-0099.html

Illinois, State of.  2000.  An act to amend the Structural Pest Control Act.  Includes notification provisions for pesticide applications in school buildings.  Schools are required adopt an integrated pest management plan unless the school can demonstrate that IPM will be more expensive than current costs for pest control. Available at http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/publicacts/pubact91/acts/91-0525.html

Illinois, Department of Public Health.  1994. Integrated Management of Structural Pests in Schools. 24 pp.  Available in pdf format, http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/DOC/ILLINOIS.PDF

Illinois General Assembly.  2003. Public Act 093-0381.  An act concerning child care facilities.  Act regards pesticide application at daycares and requires licensed day cares to give notification of spraying no more than 30 days before the application.  Act also ensures that children must be gone and return no sooner than two hours after pesticide application.  Available at http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/publicacts/fulltext.asp?Name=093-0381

Indiana, General Assembly of.  2001. House Bill 1250. Proposed bill would require the governing body of a public school or nonpublic school to adopt and implement policies and procedures designed to effectively control pests and minimize potential exposure of children to pesticides in school buildings; authorizes the state chemist to adopt rules for public and private schools and  licensed day care centers concerning the use of pesticides.  Available in  PDF format. http://www.state.in.us/serv/lsa_billinfo?year=2001&request= getBill&docno=1250

IndianaPesticide & Toxic Chemical News, Dec. 24, 2001An Indiana environmental group is increasing pressure on 59 Indiana school districts who have not adopted a model school pesticide-use policy developed by the state's school board association. The policy includes provisions to limit pesticide use when children are present, to require staff training, to provide parents and staff with "right-to-know" information and to ensure proper pesticide storage. 

Kentucky.  July 1, 2002.  302 KAR 29:050. Commercial structural pest control and fumigation. Section 12. Pesticide application in schools.  Requires an "IPM Program" including 24-hour pre-notification for parents and others opting for notification with exemption for emergency applications; requires pesticide applicators be certified with exceptions for anti-microbials, personal repellents, ectoparasite treatments and inaccessible pastes or gels. http://www.lrc.state.ky.us/kar/302/029/050.htm

Maine Board of Pesticides Control. Oct. 18, 2002The Maine Board of Pesticides Control has adopted a  regulation which will require advance notification to parents and staff of pesticide applications, adoption of a school IPM policy by each school board, and appointment of an IPM coordinator for each school. The new regulations apply to all public and private schools serving any grades between and including K through 12 and will go into effect before the start of the 2003-2004 school year. The text of the regulation is available at http://www.thinkfirstspraylast.org/schoolipm.

Maryland, Department of Agriculture.  1999. Regulations pertaining to Integrated Pest Management and Notification of Pesticide Use in a Public Schools.  11 pp.  Available in pdf format at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/DOC/MD_SCHOOLREGS.PDF

Massachusetts, Commonwealth of. 2000. Children’s and Families’ Protection Act. Addresses notification, requires IPM, restricts the types of pesticides that can be used in schools and daycares, and provides for a statewide registry of pesticide use. Available at http://www.state.ma.us/legis/laws/seslaw00/ sl000085.htm.

Michigan, Department of Agriculture.  Description of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act 451 of 1994 and Regulation 637. This act requires that before a pesticide application is made in schools, public buildings and health care facilities, a verifiable IPM Program must be in place fore each building. Available at http://www.michigan.gov/mda/1,1607,7-125-1568_2391 _2450---CI,00.html.

Minnesota, State Legislature. Chapter 326, Article 6, Section 18B.063. States that the state shall use integrated pest management techniques in its management of public lands. Available at http://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/stats/18B/063.html

Minnesota, State Legislature.  2000.  Janet B. Johnson Parents' Right-to-Know Act of 2000. Schools are required to provide notification only if they apply toxicity category I, II, and III pesticides (classified by the US Environmental Protection Agency) or restricted use pesticides (defined by federal law). Available at https://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/statutes/?id=121A.30

National Pest Management Association. 2005.  A state-by-state list of pest management laws and regulations for schools. Available here

New Jersey, State Legislature.  2002.  The New Jersey "School Integrated Pest Management Act," which was introduced in the Assembly as A2841and referred to the Assembly Environment and Solid Waste Committee on 10/3/02, was subsequently substituted for the original Senate version of the bill, S137 on 10/28/02On 10/28/02 it unanimously passed both Houses and is currently on the Governor's desk for his review and signature.  His signature is anticipated in the near future.  Among other items, it mandates that New Jersey schools each develop and adopt an Integrated Pest Management policy. See the full text act at http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2002/Bills/ A3000/2841_I1.HTM.

New Mexico, State Board of Education.  2000.  Pesticide Control Act 9.13.4. Schools are required to develop procedures for the implementation of pest management with consideration for reducing pesticide impacts on human health and the environment.  Available at http://www.beyondpesticides.org/ SCHOOLS/schoolpolicies/links_ statelaws/NM.pdf.

New York, State of. 2003. New York School Environmental Law, Section 37-0109. This law makes it illegal for schools and public playgrounds to construct playground equipment made from pressure treated lumber that contains Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA). The Healthy Schools Network, Inc. has an informative 2-page fact sheet on the new law and CCA in general  available at http://www.healthyschools.org/documents/CCA_Guide.pdf. Bill text available at http://law.onecle.com/new-york/environmental-conservation/ENV037-0109_37-0109.html  

New York, State of. 2002.  A10221 and S7167. Prohibits the use of chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated lumber in any new public or school playgrounds.  The bill also requires existing CCA-treated structures be maintained to minimize leaching of CCA and instructs the commissioner of environmental conservation to publish information about the dangers of CCA-treated lumber along with methods and materials for minimizing leaching. Bill text available at http://public.leginfo.state.ny.us/menugetf.cgi, enter bill no. and year.

New York, State of. 2001.  Senate Bill S1974. Establishes special requirements for pesticide applications in schools; requires pest management plans including provision for integrated pest management techniques and notices to be given to building occupants; applies to grounds as well as buildings and prohibits pesticide applications which are preventative in nature and do not respond to existing, verifiable pest problems.   Find info at http://public.leginfo.state.ny.us/menugetf.cgi, enter bill no. and year.

New York, State of.  2001.  Assembly Bill A6024 is reintroduced as the "children's environmental health and safety bill of rights act", directing the commissioners of health, education and environmental conservation to develop programs and regulations to promote the protection of children from environmental hazards, report to the governor and legislature and provide public access to information about environmental health issues and hazards.  Would require creation of a multi-stakeholder advisory council on children's environmental health and safety. Find info at http://public.leginfo.state.ny.us/menugetf.cgi, enter bill no. and year.

NJ Environmental Federation.  2003.  Fact sheet on The School Integrated Pest Management Act of 2002. Breaks each part of the New Jersey School IPM Act of 2002, into pieces, explaining it in a 2-page, descriptive fact sheet. Available in Word format.

Oregon, State of. 2009. SB 637. Requires adoption of integrated pest management plans for schools. Specifies certain requirements for integrated pest management plans. [Provides for State Department of Agriculture enforcement.] Authorizes governing bodies to adopt, improve or continue any integrated pest management plan that provides protection against pesticide exposure equal to or greater than protections required by Act. Makes public pesticide applicator license requirements applicable to pesticide applications at school campuses. http://www.leg.state.or.us/09reg/measpdf/sb0600.dir/sb0637.a.pdf

Owens, K. and J. Feldman.  2000.  The schooling of state pesticide laws - 2000: A review of state pesticide laws regarding schools. Report updates an earlier report issues in 1998, and includes summaries of legislation in 31 states that specifically regulate pesticide use in and schools. Legislation is described in five categories: buffer zones around schools where pesticide use is restricted; posting signs; prior notification; IPM; and reentry intervals. Pesticides and You 20(2):16-23. Available at http://www.beyondpesticides.org/ (Go to Reports: Pesticides in Schools.)

Owens, K. and J. Feldman.  1998. The Schooling of State Pesticide Laws:  Review of State Pesticide Laws Regarding Schools and Addendum.  National Coalition Against Misuse of Pesticides. Available in PDF format at http://www.beyondpesticides.org (Go to Reports: Pesticides in Schools.)

PennsylvaniaPesticide & Toxic Chemical News, Vol. 30, No. 14. Alternative pest management has been added to the curriculum of Pennsylvania's public schools. The State Board of Education and the Regulatory Review Commission have adopted academic standards for environmental studies, of which IPM will be a part. On the regulatory side, a bill currently before the Pennsylvania Senate would require advance notification of pesticide applications within schools and on school grounds, athletic fields and playgrounds. It also would require notification for the implementation of IPM programs in schools.

Pennsylvania, Senate Bill 705. 18 Apr. 2002Sponsored by Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R-Bucks), the bill amends the Public School Code by adding a section addressing integrated pest management programs.  The legislation requires schools to adopt integrated pest management plans in accordance with the integrated pest management policies or regulations of the Department of Agriculture.  The schools are required to adopt an integrated pest management plan by Jan. 1, 2003. The bill also places responsibilities on the Department of Agriculture to assist schools in the development, planning and preparation of the integrated pest management plan.  The bill passed unanimously and is effective immediately. Bill text available here.

Pennsylvania State IPM Program. 2002. Public schools across Pennsylvania will have until the end of the year, 2002, to comply with new legislation requiring them to give notification before applying pesticides and to adopt integrated pest management (IPM) plans.  To help schools meet the deadline, the Pennsylvania IPM Program (PA IPM) has prepared information packets and sent them out to every school district in the state.  To read a full text article on this partnership, go to http://www.ipminstitute.org/PA_IPM_Partnership_article. htm.

Rhode Island, State of.  2001. Rhode Island School Pest Management Act of 2001. Proposed bill would create a state school IPM advisory board and require school districts to implement IPM systems including posting and notification, restrict use of certain pesticides and apply monetary penalties collected as a result of violations to IPM education. http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/billtext/ billtext01/senatetext01/s0660.htm

Rutgers Cooperative Extension.  2003.  School IPM Act. Includes a comprehensive summary and full text of the School IPM Act adopted by the state of New Jersey.  Available at http://www.pestmanagement.rutgers.edu/ IPM/SchoolIPM/NJAct/nj.htm.

SEPA.  2002.  The School Environment Protection Act (SEPA) is part of the Senate passed farm bill. SEPA was revived after being defeated by the Education Conference Panel as an amendment to the education bill. In response to Congressional concern, language was added to SEPA to clarify that mosquito and fire ant abatement districts will not be impacted by the legislation. To see SEPA highlights and model schools, please see full text of http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/leaf.htm

Texas, Structural Pest Control Service.  1997. Integrated Pest Management in Schools. Red/Yellow/Green pesticide risk ranking system. More info at http://www.agr.state.tx.us/spcs/ipm/Adopting%20IPM%20In%20Schools.htm

U.S. House of Representatives. 2003. National legislation that would require schools to implement Integrated Pest Management programs has been introduced in congress, this time by Rep. Rush Holt (D-N.J.). The School Environmental Protection Act of 2003 (HR121) would also require school districts to notify parents and employees in advance of pesticide applications in schools. The bill was introduced on Jan 7, 2003, and was referred to the Subcommittee on Conservation, Credit, Rural Development and Research on January 28. To read the full version of the bill or a summary, or to check on its current status, visit the Thomas website at http://thomas.loc.gov/ and enter the bill number HR121 under “search."

U.S. House of Representatives. 2001. School Pesticide Provision to H.R. 1: Hearing before the Subcommittee on Department Operations, Oversight, Nutrition and Forestry of the Committee on Agriculture. This document is comprised of statements and materials submitted to a July 18, 2001 hearing on the school pesticide provision included in a Senate amendment to House Resolution 1 (H.R. 1), the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Included are statements from expert witnesses: executive director of the National Coalition Against the Misuse of Pesticides, president of the National Association of Agriculture Educators, representatives of the National School Boards Association and the National Association of School Administrators, president of the American Crop Protection Association, and a senior entomologist representing the American Mosquito Control Association. 103p.  To order from the Education Resources Information Center, http://www.eric.ed.gov/, use ERIC NO: ED463635.

U.S. Senate Bill S.1716, 2000.  School Environment Protection Act, Proposed legislation would require annual notification of schools pest management practices including pesticides used; specify that least-toxic methods be used with pesticides as a last resort; and create a 12-member School IPM Advisory Board to develop a list of acceptable pesticides and uniform standard for IPM implementation in schools. Bill text and bill summary available at http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/sepa.htm

Vermont, Department of Social and Rehabilitative Services (SRS).  "Early Childhood Program Licensing Regulations." Regulations state that pesticides shall be used only when other pest prevention and control measures fail and pesticides shall not be used to control pests for aesthetic reasons alone. The regulations also require that staff and parents of children shall be notified in writing prior to any planned application of pesticides. Notice shall include the site of the planned application, the pest(s) to be treated for, and proposed pesticide(s) to be used.  The application of pesticides, when necessary, is restricted to times when children are not present. PDF version of regulations available at http://www.state.vt.us/srs/childcare /licensing/license.htm

Vermont, State of.  2000.  School Environmental Health Act 125. The act addresses the issues of air quality and other environmental factors that might affect health of children, staff and teachers in our schools. http://www.leg.state.vt.us/docs/2000/acts/act125.htm

Washington, State of. 2001. SB 5533. Posting and notification of pesticide applications at schools. Requires day care centers and public elementary and secondary schools to provide certain notices of its pest control policies and methods and to provide notice of and post signs regarding applications of pesticides to its buildings and property, and provides exemptions from this requirement; and expands the types of applications of pesticides to other landscapes for which notification markers must be placed and regarding which
records must be kept.
Available in PDF format here.

West Virginia, Department of Agriculture.  1996.  Integrated Pest Management Programs in Schools and Daycare Centers.  11 pp. Available in pdf format, 
http://schoolipm.ifas.ufl.edu/DOC/WV_REG.PDF

Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection.  http://folio.legis.state.wi.us/cgi-bin/om_isapi.dll?clientID=227879&infobase=
stats.nfo&j1=94.715&jump=94.715&softpage=Browse_Frame_Pg
is a link to the statutes governing pesticide use at public schools and School Board responsibilities.

Wyoming, State of. 2001.  House Bill 28. Pesticides in schools. Proposed bill requires notification of pesticide application in or on school facilities and property; specifies requirements for posting of signs; authorizes school boards to develop policies on pesticide use in or on school facilities. http://legisweb.state.wy.us/2001/engross/hb0028.htm

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School Pesticide Use Surveys

Addiss, S. S., N. O. Alderman, D. R. Brown, C. N. Eash and J. Wargo. 1999.  Pest Control Practices in CT Public Schools.  Environment and Human Health, Inc.  Available at http://www.ehhi.org/reports/pestschools/.

Agricultural Resources Center & Pesticide Education Project.  2003.  Clean Schools, Safe Kids. Includes success stories, cost comparisons, and resources for school staff, parents, and others interested in improving school environmental health by reducing pesticide dependence. Copies available from ARC/PESTed at (919) 833-1123, or at www.PESTed.org.

Alabama Cooperative Extension.  2000.  Alabama School Pest Management Survey. Includes copy of the survey as well as raw data from the completed survey.

Becker, B., E. Bergman, N. Zuelsdorff, K. Fenster, B. Swingle and J. Larson. 1998. Final Report on Pesticide Use in Wisconsin Schools.  49 pp.  Publication # AR-0263. Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, PO Box 8911, Madison WI 53708-8911, 608 224-4500, Fax 608 224-4656.

Braband, L., E. Horn and L. Sahr.  2002. Pest Management Practices: A survey of public school districts in New York StateThis 21-page bulletin presents results from 603 completed surveys representing 741 districts in New York. The survey was jointly developed and administered by the NYS Education Department, the NYS Department of Health, and the NYS Community IPM Program.  NYS IPM Program, NYSAES, Geneva, NY 14456.  Publication NYS IPM No. 613.  Available at http://www.mindfully.org/Pesticide/2002/Pest-Management-Practices-Survey-NYIPMJun02.htm.

Brown, A. and J. Schmidt.  2000.  Journal of Pesticide Safety Education.  "Response to Pre-Notification of Pesticide Application in a Public School System." 14-page paper reports on the survey of parents and staff responses to the pesticide pre-notification program implemented in a Maryland county school system. Available at http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JPSE/v2/ brown.pdf.  

Bush, A. and P. Clary.  2004.  "Are Schools Flunking Out?  Mid-Term Report Card on Chemical Pest Management."  Californians for Alternatives to Toxics.  Three-year study reports level of compliance of 305 public schools in 89 California school districts with the Healthy Schools Act.  Available at http://www.alternatives2toxics.org/schoolsreport.htm.   

Californians for Pesticide Reform.  2002.  Learning Curve:  Charting Progress of Pesticide Use and the Healthy Schools Act. The report, written by California Public Interest Research Group (CALPIRG) Charitable Trust, compiles information about pesticide use and compliance with the Healthy Schools Act in California's 15 largest school districts. The report highlights inconsistent compliance with the Act across the state, information on pesticide use, IPM policies and implementation of the Act in the surveyed school districts, and recommendations for school districts, parents, teachers and state policy-makers. Available at http://www.calhealthyschools.org or http://www.pesticidereform.org or call 888-CPR-4880 (outside of California call 415-981-3939.)  

Delahaut, K. 2001. "Wisconsin's program for school pest management protects children." Over 67 percent of Wisconsin's schools have participated in Integrated Pest Management, or IPM programming in an effort to reduce health risks to children. A total of 1,395 schools had voluntarily participated in the program by August and new state legislation on pesticide use in schools was enacted in September. Available at http://www1.uwex.edu/news/story.cfm/433

Fournier, A. and T. Johnson.  2003.  Implementation of Pilot Integrated Pest Management Programs in Indiana Schools and Child Care Facilities. 30-page survey examines IPM use at three Indiana school districts and four child care facilities. Includes sections entitled methods, project outcomes and lessons learned.  Available at http://www.entm.purdue.edu/entomology/outreach/schoolipm/Update%20May%202003/IDEM%20Pilot%20report%20fin.htm.

Gibb, T. and F. Whitford.  1998.  Parents, Public Schools and Integrated Pest Management. 29-page report from Purdue emphasizes the need for parents to become involved with the implementation of pest management policies in schools. Available at http://www.btny.purdue.edu/PPP/B-770.pdf.   

Hollingsworth, C.S.  1996. "Pest management in Massachusetts schools: a survey of practices and perceptions." A survey of 100 school conducted in 1995. Includes, methods, results, summary and conclusions and resources.  Available from the Univ. Mass. Ext. Bull. 217. 14 pp.  Available at http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/ ipm_projects/education/pest_management _MA_schools.html.

Iowa State University Extension.  2000.  Iowa School Pesticide Use Survey.  Survey in HTML format provides raw data from 31-question survey.  Available at http://www.ipm.iastate.edu/ipm/schoolipm/node/view/106.

Kaplan, J., S. Marquardt and W. Barber.  1998.  Failing Health: Pesticide Use in California Schools. 36 pp. CALPIRG Charitable Trust and Californians for Pesticide Reform.  Available at http://www.environmentcalifornia.org/uploads/4y/ZT/4yZTutoM4qJ1-lRmaTRa2g/Failing_Health.pdf

Lilley, S. 1999.  A Pest Management Survey of North Carolina Public Schools.  11-page survey is divided into nine sections: 1. Introduction, 2. IPM Usage, 3. Pest Control Decision Making, 4. Who Does Pest Control?, 5. Common Pests, 6. How are pests applied?, 7. Record keeping and scheduling, 8. Summary, and 9. References. Available at http://ipm.ncsu.edu/urban/cropsci/SchoolIPM/reports.html.

Lilley, S. and G. Nalyanya. 2002.  Pest Control Practices in North Carolina Public Schools. Survey is divided into seven sections: 1. Introduction, 2. Objectives, 3. Methodology, 4. Results, 5. Conclusions, 6. Recommendations, and 7. References.  Available at http://ipm.ncsu.edu/urban/cropsci/ SchoolIPM/reports.html.

Long, J. K.  1998. IPM in Schools Final Report. Pennsylvania Integrated Pest  
Management Program. Information from 344 out of 501 districts, and 60% of all public school buildings in the state.  Available at http://paipm.cas.psu.edu/schools/Schoolsum.html

Loudon, E.  1999. Weed Wars: Pesticide Use in Washington Schools. Washington Toxics Coalition, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., Suite 540 - E, Seattle WA 98103, 206 632-1545, Email, Website www.watoxics.org

Maryland. 1998. A Report on Pesticide Use in Maryland Schools. Available from Maryland Public Interest Research Group, (410) 467-0439, Email, Web site http://www.marylandpirg.org/

Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group, 1996.  Primary Exposure: Pesticides in Massachusetts Schools. Studies pesticide use in 18 schools across the state, and offers recommendations for alternatives such as IPM. Available from Mass PIRG,
29 Temple PlaceBoston MA 02111. (617) 292-4800, FAX (617) 292-8057, Email, Website http://www.masspirg.org/

Miller, S. 2002. The Vermont Public Interest Research Group, Inc. has funded a new report entitled Reading, Writing and Raid(R) documenting pesticide use in Vermont schools.  This 21-page report includes includes an extensive background as well as full report on what Vermont schools and parents can do. Available at http://www.vpirg.org/campaigns/ environmentalHealth/pesticide_report.pdf  

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.  2002. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture, with funding provided by the US EPA, Region 5, recently completed a Pest Management Survey of Day Cares, Head Starts, and Preschools.  Available at http://www.mda.state.mn.us/ipm/ipmpubs.html.

Minnesota, Department of Agriculture.  2000.  Quantitative Research Regarding Pest Management Practices in Minnesota K-12 Schools. 147 pp.  Available at http://www.mda.state.mn.us/IPM/PestMgmtin Schools.html

Mitchell, K., ed.  1999.  Pesticide Report Card: Texas Schools Score from A to F in the Integrated 
Pest Management Program.  30 pp. Texas
Pesticide Information Network/Consumers Union, 1300 Guadalupe, Suite 100, Austin TX 78701. (512) 477-4431. Available at http://www.texascenter.org/txpin/right.htm

Murray, K., 2000. What's Bugging Our Schools?: Pest Concerns and Pesticide Use in Maine Public Schools. 17 pp.  Maine Department of Agriculture, Food and Rural Resources, 28 State House Station, Augusta ME 04333.  Available at http://www.state.me.us/agriculture/pesticides/schoolipm/schoolipm _report.pdf

Nalyanya, G., J.C. Gore, H.M. Linker and C. Schal.  2009.  German cockroach allergen levels in North Carolina Schools: Comparison of Integrated Pest Management and conventional cockroach control. J. Med. Entomol.  46(3): 420-427.

New York State Environmental Protection Bureau.  2000.  Pesticide Use at New York Schools: Reducing the Risk.  Report includes executive summary, administrative mandate to reduce pesticide exposure, 1999 survey of schools, a how-to guide, recommendation and conclusion.  Available at http://www.oag.state.ny.us/press/reports/pesticide_school/table_of_contents. html.

New York State Environmental Protection Bureau. 2000.  Pesticide Use by County Governments: Reducing the Risk.  Report includes introduction, survey methods, results and discussion.  Available at http://www.oag.state.ny.us/ press/ reports/pesticide_government/table_of_contents.html.

Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides and Oregon Center for Environmental Health. 1998. Pesticide Use by the Portland School District.  9 pp. Available in pdf format at http://www.pesticide.org/PDXSchools.html

Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides and Washington Toxics Coalition. 1998. Pesticide Use by the Seattle School District.  8 pp.  Available at http://www.pesticide.org/SeattleSchools.html

Ohio Schools Pest Management Survey. 2001. HTML document provides raw data from 2001 survey given to Ohio school personal regarding IPM. Available at http://ipm.osu.edu/school/survey.htm

Olle, T.M.  2000. "P" is for Poison: Update on Pesticide Use in California Schools.  32 pp. CALPIRG Charitable Trust and Californians for Pesticide Reform.  Available at http://pesticidereform.org/downloads/healthyschools.pdf

Pesticide Use in Illinois Public Schools: Survey Findings. 1998.  Available from Safer Pest Control Project, 25 E. Washington St, Suite 1515, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 641-5575Fax (312) 641-5454Email, Website http://www.spcpweb.org/

Piper, C., and K. Owens.  2002.  Are Schools Making the Grade? School Districts Nationwide Adopt Safer Pest Management Policies. 10-page report documents many school districts that have adopted safer pest management policies while discussing many state pest management laws.  Available at http://www.beyondpesticides.org/ SCHOOLS/publications/ index.htm.

Rumph, M., T. Cofer, S. Adams, W. Foshee, W. Johnson, B. Alverson, B. Cauthen, R. Pont and L. Graham.  2000.  Report of the Alabama IPM in Schools Working Group "2000 Alabama School IPM Survey." 

Safer Pest Control Project.  1998.  Pesticide Use in Illinois Public Schools: Survey Findings, 1998.  Available from SPCT, 25 E. Washington St, Suite 1515, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 641-5575, Fax (312) 641-5454, EmailSummary available at http://www.spcpweb.org/resultsummary.pdf.  

School Pesticide Reform Coalition and Beyond Pesticides. 2003. Safer Schools: Achieving a Healthy Learning Environment Through Integrated Pest Management. With descriptions of 27 school districts of all sizes from 19 states, this report describes a growing commitment to adopt practices that respond to mounting evidence that pesticides pose a public health hazard while non-toxic, economically feasible pest management options are available. Available at http://www.beyondpesticides.org/schools/publications/IPMSuccessStories.pdf. Printed copies available for $5.00 each by contacting Beyond Pesticides at 202-543-5450 or email.

Simmons, S.E., T.E. Tidwell and T.A. Barry. 1996.  Overview of Pest Management Policies, Program and Practices in Selected California Public School Districts. PM96-01. California Department of Pesticide Regulation. 68 pp. 

Spitzer, E.  2000.  Pesticide Use at NY Schools: Reducing the Risk.  Office of the Attorney General of NY State.  Available at http://www.oag.state.ny.us/ press/reports/pesticide_school/table_of_contents.html.

Sterling, P. and N. Paquette.  1999.  Toxic Chemical Exposure in Schools: Our Children are at Risk. Vermont Public Interest Research Group.  26 pp. Report including case studies in Vermont schools. Available at http://www.vpirg.org/pubs/ background_reports.html

Sterling, P. and B. Browning.  1999.  Chemicals in Classrooms:  Pesticides and Maintenance Chemicals in Vermont Schools.  Vermont Public Interest Research Group. 2 6 pp. Report including survey results from 32 Vermont schools.  Available at http://www.vpirg.org/PUBS/reports.html

Volberg, D.I., M. H. Surgan, S. Jaffe, D. Hamer and J. A. Sevinsky.  1993.  Pesticides in Schools: Reducing the Risks. New York State Department of Law, Environmental Protection Bureau.   http://www.oag.state.ny.us/environment/schools96.html

Washington Toxics Report Coalition. 2004.  A Lesson in Prevention: Measuring Pesticide Use in Washington Schools. 56-page report looks at 50 school districts' pesticide use in the state of Washington.  Found that 96 percent use pesticides linked to cancer, nervous system damage, reproductive or developmental harm, or endocrine disruption.  Available at http://www.watoxics.org/content/pdf/LessonInPrevention.pdf.   

Waters, Ann et al. 2002. Email dialogue between Ann Waters, Karen Vail, Clay Scherer, Craig Hollingsworth, Eric Althouse and Kathy Murray including information on resources to help survey schools about IPM.  Download available in MS Word format. 

Wisconsin Environmental Decade and Citizens for a Better Environment.  1998. Pesticide Use Reduction & Information Campaign. Results of Wisconsin Department of Agriculture and Trade Survey on Pesticide Use in Schools.  Available at www.wsn.org/pesticides/schools.shtml

Back to Links & Resources - Contents

Childcare Pesticide Use Surveys

Fournier, A., and T. Johnson.  2003 .  Implementation of Pilot Integrated Pest Management Programs in Indiana Schools and Child Care Facilities.  Department of Entomology, IPM Technical Resource Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.  www.entm.purdue.edu/entomology/outreach/schoolipm/Update May 2003/IDEM Pilot report fin.htm

Greencare for Children. 2004. Measuring Environmental Hazards in the Childcare Industry: Pesticides, Lead and Indoor Air Quality. http://www.greencareforchildren.org/vdb/document/40

Illinois Department of Public Health. 2009. IPM Workshop Evaluation. Developed as a survey for use in training courses for public schools and day care centers. PDF.

Iowa State University Extension. 2007. Survey of Chemical Use and Pest Control Practices in Iowa's Licensed Childcare Centers. PDF.

Jones, P.  2002.  Minnesota Head Start/Day Care/Preschool Pest Management Practices Survey: Report of Survey Results.  Minnesota Center for Survey Research, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. 

School IPM Success Stories

Arizona pilot expands to 27 schools in 2001. An initial pilot program in three middle schools in Maricopa County documented a 90% reduction in pesticide use and an estimated 85% reduction in pest pressure. Contact for the project is Dawn GougeView summary in PDF format.

Bennett, M. E.  Journal of Pesticide Reform. "A Pesticide-free School for a Chemically Sensitive Family in Boise, Idaho." Discusses the efforts of one family to change the pesticide policy of their school district are described. Stressed is the need to educate teachers, physicians, and students.

Beyond Pesticides.  2002.  Schools Save Money With Integrated Pest Management: A Beyond Pesticides Fact Sheet. This 2-page fact sheet documents and discusses many instances of IPM helping to reduce pest management costs for schools. Available at http://www.beyondpesticides.org/ SCHOOLS/publications/IPM_cost%20_FS.pdf.

Lavendal, Brian. Audubon. "Taking Back the Halls."  Sept./Oct. 2001. Students at Lewis Cass Technical High School in downtown Detroit are taking back the halls.  Cass Tech School students are top of their class, but their eight-story school is old, allowing many unwanted critters into the halls. The students at this magnet high school run their own school-wide pest-control science project using IPM. Science teacher Michael Jones traces the students' IPM program back to a science-fair project in which students in his chemistry class tried to help a homeowner whose house had been infected with termites.  Students learned of numerous nontoxic alternatives for controlling pests while also 
applying for grant money opportunities for student-run IPM programs from the Michigan Department of Agriculture.  The student-led IPM team has been successful, noting a "significant decline in the roach population in the first year."  The facilities manager for the school even claims that the students have done a better job in controlling pests than his custodians and contractors ever did.  Kathy Seiken. senior policy analyst for the EPA, say the Cass Tech IPM program is "fantastic," urging other schools to take a look at it as 
an alternative to conventional pest control. It is truly a scenario that "most teachers only dream of, these students put their lessons to work every day... not shy about sharing their expertise at home and in the community."

The Lebanon School Corporation (LSC) in Indiana is currently working with their pest management provider to shift to a full IPM program during the 2003-2004 school year. In March, Al Fournier from Purdue’s IPM Technical Resource Center met with building administrators (principals and assistant principals) to develop a plan for getting building staff on board with IPM. 

The Lime Kiln Middle School PTA is continuing to explore alternatives under the ongoing IPM (Integrated Pest Management) initiatives for grounds maintenance at the school. The Howard  County Public School System (HCPSS) has agreed to suspend the routine spraying of pesticides to maintain the grounds, if PTA volunteers maintain the landscaped beds. In response, PTA has established a workgroup to organize this effort and coordinate a team of weeding volunteers' that perform general gardening such as cutting back flowers, pruning, weeding, edging, etc. The Lime Kiln Middle School PTA's Call for volunteers is available in Word or PDF forms and includes the information for volunteer coordinator Veronika Carella. Phone 410-489-5495 or email if you have any questions.

The New York City Board of Education, representing approximately 1200 school buildings, has eliminated indoor dust formulations of every kind to reduce airborne particulates, eliminated all "pelleted" rodenticides to reduce possibility of translocation, eliminated outside rodenticide baitsets opting to bait and close existing burrows only, increased reliance on glue board monitoring as both indicator and precursory control agents, and reduced the use of one class of pesticides from 918 to 22 lbs. per year. Since 1988, the school system has used over 8000 tubes of sealing silicone glue to close potential pest entries.  As of the September 2001 school opening, the New York City Board of Education has totally eliminated the use of carbamates, organo-phosphates, pyrethroids, and even pyrethrin treatments anywhere in their buildings.  Also, they still use no aerosols of any kind in classrooms and use no dust products whatsoever anywhere in their schools.  

A demonstration project at two public schools in Santa Barbara County CA reduced the costs by 30%, and improved effectiveness of the pest control program. More information available from 930 Miramonte Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109, Phone: (805) 963-0583, Fax: (805) 962-9080, Email

The Monroe County School Corporation, Monroe County IN, implemented a pilot IPM program that eliminated 90% of pesticide applications in three elementary schools. More at http://www.epa.gov/oppbppd1/PESP/strategies/ 2004/mccsc04.htm

"Pest fighters cut chemical dependency" 2001. Concern over state and federal efforts to impose potentially costly rules governing insecticide use in schools has prompted nearly 92 percent of Hoosier schools to adopt a voluntary pest-control program designed to cut applications of chemicals and poisons by 90 percent. http://www.starnews.com/article.php?pests20.htm

An IPM curriculum was implemented at Emerson Elementary School in Michigan, and a school IPM program was started in a Saginaw High School in the spring, based on the successful Cass Tech High School model. The IPM training team (from Michigan Dept. of Agriculture and the Michigan Pest Control Association) does monthly trainings of the students and also works with an elementary school in the neighborhood. They held a spring parade in the neighborhood to heighten IPM awareness in the community, and the next day, 200 volunteers began cleaning up pest harborage sites in the neighborhood. The program runs through GAP: the Growth & Afrocentric Program, a broad, community-based effort to improve student health, academics, and future outlook and more information is available at http://www.spsd.net/GAP/Classroom.htm.

Safer Pest Control Project.  2002.  Cost of IPM in Schools. 2-page fact sheet includes information on the cost effectiveness of IPM in schools.  Comments on Monroe County Schools in Indiana and Susqueanna School in New York, providing information on how much money IPM has saved these schools.  Available at http://www.spcpweb.org/schcost.pdf.

In January the Tippecanoe School Corporation in Indiana approved a plan to enhance their existing IPM program with more intensive monitoring and record keeping in all their schools as well as incorporating IPM trainings for staff in the 2003-2004 school year. They have designated an IPM Coordinator and negotiated a new contract with their pest control provider to facilitate the new program.

Three Kyrene schools reduce pesticide applications by 90% and keep pest populations below 85% of their normal level by implementing a pilot IPM program.

Add your success story!

IPM Curricula and Workshop Ideas

American Museum of Natural History.  1999. Seven entertaining modules on microbes including "Meet the microbes, Bacteria in the cafeteria, How Lou got the flu, Prevention convention." Available at http://www.amnh.org/explore/infection/index.html

Bailey, S.  1999. Get This Bug Off of Me! University of Kentucky Dept. of Entomology. Color photo guide to more than 30 dangerous and harmless arthropods. Available at http://www.uky.edu/agriculture/entomology /ythfacts/stories/hurtrnot.htm

British Society for Plant Pathology. 2004.  "aMaizing Plant Disease Game."  Simultaneously exercise your plant pathology and gaming skills and intuition in a contest to thwart a nasty virtual pathogen attempting to invade an innocent maize crop.  The aim of the online game is to "grow" a maize crop, and do it profitably, with in a range of various input alternatives and a threat of disease capable of destroying the crop.  The game, open to all, is on the BSPP website at http://www.bspp.org.uk/.

Canadian Geographic.  2002.  Grasshopper Facts website.  "A grand look a grasshoppers" includes interactive games, fun facts and scientific knowledge about grasshoppers.  Available at http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/Magazine/ Mj02/etcetera/index.htm.

Cullen, E.  1995. IPM Curriculum for Grades 9-12.  200 pp. IPM basics including monitoring and cultural, physical, biological and least-toxic chemical controls; insect profiles, study programs, case studies, lab experiments, resource list, glossary; designed to be part of a science, chemistry or biology course; emphasis on agricultural, horticultural and garden pests. Available from  Bio-Integral Resource Center, P.O. Box 7414, Berkeley CA 94707, (510) 524-2567, FAX (510) 524-1758, Email, Website http://www.birc.org.

Cycling Back to Nature: Food Production and Pesticides. Nationally juried curriculum including food production and environmental and health effects of pesticide use in agriculture; food webs and biological diversity; analysis of agriculture and pesticide use in the U.S.; global demand for food and population trends. Available in print from National 4-H Council, 7100 Connecticut Ave, Chevy Chase MD 20815. (301) 961-2908, FAX (301) 961-2894, E-mail: envstew%smtpgate@fourhcouncil.edu, more information including comments from reviewers available at http://www.reeusda.gov/4h/ curricul/da2.htm  

Dunn, G.A. and J. VanDyk. Iowa State Entomology Index: K-12 Educators' Recommended Sites. Links to over 30 Web sites with insect-related curricula, projects and information. Available at http://www.ent.iastate.edu/list/ k-12_educator_resources.html

Exploring Urban Integrated Management: Activities and Resources for Teaching K-6. 2002. A 76-page curriculum guide for teaching school and community IPM in the elementary classroom. This resource includes teacher fact sheets, lesson plans, and student worksheets on topics including IPM steps and decision making, insect and rodent pests, inspections, and control method choices.  From the Michigan State University Pesticide Education Program with a grant from US EPA Region 5 and the Michigan Department of Agriculture. Available at http://www.pested.msu.edu/CommunitySchoolIpm/curriculum.htm.

National School IPM Web site. The CD-ROM contains everything on the Web site including IPM information from IPM experts across the nation that is orientated to administrators, teachers, parents and pest management professionals. It also includes advice on how to develop an IPM program; alternative methods of pest control; information on pests and pesticides safety; news releases on IPM and pests for school newsletters; Powerpoint presentations on; sample contacts and letters; educational materials; links to school related Web site in numerous areas (organized by subject and location); and much more. The web site is now available complete on a CD-ROM for use in stand-alone or networking environments for both PCs and Macs. It requires a CD-ROM drive and graphical browser.  The cost of this  CD-ROM is $8. Additional copies may be purchased through the UF/IFAS Extension Bookstore by calling 800-226-1764 or on the Web at http://ifasbooks.ufl.edu. Discounts are not available at this price. Funds generated by the sale of this CD-ROM are used to maintain and add to the National School IPM Web site.

Kneen, Cathleen. The Community Garden Game is a non-competitive card game designed to increase interest in community gardening. There are 12 vegetables so the game can be played with up to 12 players. With a roll of the dice you may find that the pony club has decided to compost their manure and donate it to the garden -- the whole garden takes a point -- or that a bunch of kids raid the garden -- peas and beans lose one each. You may find that you planted potatoes in the same place as last year and they get scab -- potatoes lose one; or that the community kitchen develops a great bean recipe -- beans take one. There are 40 negative and 40 positive cards, so lots can happen in your garden! The goal of the game is to harvest as much of each vegetable as possible. Order the Community Garden Game for $10 plus $2 for postage from: Cathleen Kneen, S-6, C-27, RR #1, Sorrento, B.C., V0E 2W0, Canada.

Koehler, P., T. Fasulo, C. Scherer and M. Downey, Eds. 1999. School IPM Web Site. University of  FloridaLinks to IPM curricula from land grant institutions; Introduction to need for IPM in schools; descriptions and links to lesson plan and materials for students and for teachers and 8-week Internet  course for teachers; example of school IPM lesson plan; references.  Produced by Montana State University. Available at http://schoolipmifas.ufl.edu/teach.htm

Leon County Mosquito Control.  2002. Mosquito Control Education Program.  Education plays a primary role in the integrated pest management program used by Leon County Mosquito Control. Leon Country Mosquito Control has designed a curriculum outline, videos, a school activity book, worksheets, and examples of prizes and more to use when educating children about IPM mosquito control. Available at http://www.co.leon.fl.us/mosquito/index.asp.

Lucas, P.L.  Bug-Go. University of Kentucky IPM Program. Bingo-like game, players match pictures of beneficial insects and pests, includes player game cards, templates for overhead transparencies or display sheets, information about each insect and instructions. Available at http://www.uky.edu/Agriculture/ IPM/teachers/bug-go/bug-go.htm

LSU AgCenter.  2002.  Learning Activity: Fight the Bite!  Be a Skeeter Buster!  The LSU AgCenter has published a 6-page activity guide written by two 4-H agents. Includes 4 pages of a Q & A session as well as a step-by-step guide explaining how to play The Mosquito Game. Available at http://www.lsuagcenter.com/subjects/mosquito/pdf/SkeeterBusterlesson 9-02.pdf.

Michigan.  Pesticide Notes, Michigan State University, Jan.-Feb. 2002. Michigan State University has developed an activity guide for teaching urban integrated pest management for grades K-6. The manual is written for teachers to incorporate IPM in their classroom teaching. The activity guide is available at http://www.pested.msu.edu/CommunitySchoolIpm/curriculum.htm 

Michigan State University Extension.  2001. Exploring Urban Integrated Pest  
Management
. Michigan State University Extension provides a comprehensive activities and resource book for teaching K-6. The workbook includes twelve classroom activities and is available in PDF format at http://www.pested.msu.edu/Community SchoolIpm/curriculum.htm

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.  2002.  Fact sheets. A series of 2-page face sheets dealing with many pests found in schools including an overview, and multiple facts sheets on various insects weeds, plant diseases, rodents and pesticides. Available at http://www.mda.state.mn.us/IPM/IPMinSchools. html

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.  2000.  Join Our Pest Patrol - A Backyard Activity Book for Kids - An Adventure in IPM. 29-page book and companion third through fifth grade Teachers' Guide, includes many fun activities that can easily be incorporated into reading, science, or even math and art classes.  It provides kids and teachers with important information about pest identity and biology, and ecology. Has recently been adapted for nationwide use. Available from Minnesota Department of Agriculture, 90 West Plato BoulevardSt. Paul MN 55107-2094, more information at http://www.mda.state.mn.us/IPM/ IPMinSchools.html.  To order, call Kathy Seikel at 703-308-8272 or email.  Bulk orders accepted.

Minnesota Ideals.1998.  The Watershed Game. Interactive question/answer game for elementary students addressing agricultural and urban impacts on watershed health. Available at http://www.bellmuseum.org/distancelearning/watershed/watershed2.html.

National Pediculosis Association. Information for children about head lice, including interactive quiz and games; animations of lice, life cycle; frequently asked questions; poetry, books.  Available at http://www.headlice.org/kids/index.htm

Orkin Learning Center.  Insect Safari and Insect Safari Guidebook. Explore insect facts, games, and insect crafts for kids.  Teach kids about the scientific classification of insects.  Available at http://www.orkin.com/learningcenter/kids_and_teachers.aspx

PBS On-Line.  1999.  Alien Empire. Interactive puzzles; making insect masks; presentations on insect termites, beneficial wasps, insects as food; teacher's guide. Available at http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/ alienempire/

Pennsylvania Departments of Agriculture and Education, and Pennsylvania State University, 1998. Memorandum of Understanding. Outlines five areas of cooperation to increase public education of IPM concepts and tools. Available at http://paipm.cas.psu.edu/MOU.html

Pennsylvania IPM Program, 2002. "Join Our Pest Patrol" publication.  Educational resource for Pennsylvania teachers of students in grades 3 and 4.  Addresses newly adopted state academic standards in environment and ecology focusing on integrated pest management.  Includes crossword puzzles, fill-in-the-blanks, mazes and picture drawing.  Also available is the  accompanying teacher guide that includes facts, investigations, activities and resources to support children's curiosity and extended learning.  Concepts include distinguishing insect pests from beneficial insects; understanding why humans want to manage pests; recognizing common pests in our homes, gardens and neighborhoods; choosing the least toxic ways to manage pests;  and safeguarding against pesticide risks. Can be obtained by contacting the Pennsylvania IPM Program at (814) 865-2839 or downloaded as printable PDF files from the Web at http://paipm.cas.psu.edu. Join Our Pest Patrol 4-H Leader Guide now available online. 6-page backyard activity book is formatted for 4-H leaders. Includes a brief description of IPM, a list of common pests, many ideas for projects, information on safe pesticide use as well as an extensive bibliography. Available at http://www.mda.state.mn.us/IPM/ ipmpubs.html.  

Pennsylvania IPM Program, 2003. IPM for Teachers Curriculum.  Text from the summer class, "IPM for Teachers: Meeting New Academic Standards," includes many activities to use in the classroom along with supplemental materials. Available in HTML form at http://paipm.cas.psu.edu/schools/ courseguide.html.

Pennsylvania IPM Program, 2003.  Video "Bugmobile Vs.The Invasive Species."  The video, hosted and narrated by BugMobile, the talking Volkswagen, identifies the effects of humans and human events on watersheds, explains species diversity, introduces species that are classified as pests in their new environment, and analyzes the benefits to the environment and society associated with alternative practices used in IPM. Geared toward lower and upper secondary students, the video addresses the several categories of the state's new Academic Standards.  Each video includes a lesson plan with content objectives, assessment strategies and procedures.  Download the lesson plan free, or, to obtain a copy of the video and lesson plan, send a check or money order for $35 made payable to The Pennsylvania State University to ICT, 119 Ag Administration Building, University Park, PA 16802-2602. Visa and MasterCard orders will be accepted by calling (814) 865-6309. Shipping and handling costs are included in the price. Order Form (PDF)

Pennsylvania State Department of Education, 2000. Academic Standards for Environment and Ecology, Section 4.5. Integrated Pest Management. Detailed list of IPM topic areas to be included in curricula for students in Pennsylvania Public Schools through grade 12. Available at http://paipm.cas.psu.edu/standards.html

Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service. 2002. IPM in Schools Activity Book. This 24-page illustrated activity book contains mazes, matching games, coloring activities, connect-the-dots and much more to help kids understand Integrated Pest Management. Also includes an answer key and a "Certificate of Great Work." The activity book is now available online at http://www.entm.purdue.edu/entomology/outreach/ schoolipm/1tch/tch1.htm.  Requests for hard copies can be sent to Al Fournier, Department of Entomology, Purdue University, Smith Hall, 901 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2054, Phone: 765-496-7520, Email.

Safer Pest Control Project. Kid's guide to pesticides. Two-page fact sheet in PDF format includes discussion of pests, pesticides, risks, pesticide safety.  Available at http://www.spcpweb.org/ (go to School IPM page and follow link).

Safer Pest Control Project. Integrated Pest Management in Schools: A Better Method. This 12-minute video is aimed at helping schools, parents, pest control operators, and other groups understand and promote School IPM. Filmed at a Chicago-area school that has practiced IPM since 1994, it features testimony and advice from the school's pest control operator and operations manager. It addresses concerns about pesticide use, the advantages of practicing IPM, and the basic components of IPM. For more information, 
see School IPM Video Brochure and Order Form or call Safer Pest Control Project at (312) 641-5575.

Safer Pest Control Project.  The Pest Invasion, The Pest Invasion II, and La Invasion de los Insectos II. Three comic books that teach least hazardous pest control in a variety of settings.  The Pest Invasion chronicles one family's successful battle against roaches and rodents in a Chicago Public Housing development. To order for $1.00 each, call The Safer Pest Control Project at 312-641-5575 or email us.

Schumann, G.L., ed. APSNet Education Center: The Plant Health Instructor. American Phytopathological Society. Plant pathology curricula for K through higher education including plant disease lessons, laboratory exercises, illustrated glossary, resource catalogs and links to additional materials. 

Radcliffe, T.B. and W.D. Hutchison, eds. Radcliffe's IPM World Textbook.  Electronic college-level IPM textbook including line drawings, color and B&W photos, chapters on biological and cultural control, computers in IPM, crop and commodity-specific IPM, ecology, IPM policy, medical and veterinary IPM, pesticides, stored product IPM, links to IPM resources including photographs and decision-support software. Available at http://www.ipmworld.umn.edu/ ipmsite.htm  

US EPA. 2003. “Learn to Use Pesticides Safely" (available as a poster or bumper sticker) and “Pesticides Are Meant to Poison These... [BUGS] Not These” [KIDS] (available in poster format only) now available. Free copies of posters and stickers (bumper sticker size) urging consumers to use pesticides safely are available in both English and Spanish. Recognized for their colorful, eye-catching graphics and message, enlarged versions of these posters and stickers have appeared on trucks and metropolitan buses and trains traveling through the urban sectors of many cities. To order, write U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pesticide Programs (7506C), Communication Services Branch, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20460-0001 or call 703-305-5017.  For orders larger than 10 copies, please contact the National Service Center for Environmental Publications (NSCEP) at 1-800-490-9198.

US EPA. Interactive Cockroach Activity Book. The popular pest prevention activity book for children, Help! It's a Roach!, is now on-line.  The activities have been converted to be interactive, to provide a fun way to learn about managing indoor insect pests. The messages of removing food, water, and shelter apply to many pests, not just cockroaches.  A Spanish version of the web publication will be available soon. The web version is found at http://www.epa.gov/opp00001/kids/roaches/english/.  Paper versions of this book are available from EPA's publication center, http://www.epa.gov/ ncepihom/ordering.htm (EPA 735-F-98-016?English and EPA 735-F-01-004?Spanish).

US EPA.  Help Yourself to a Healthy Home: Protect you Children’s Health. Popular 56-page booklet contains helpful information for parents, grandparents and other care givers.  Contains information on  environmental contaminants found in many American homes and how to protect your family from risks posed by carbon monoxide, unhealthy drinking waters, poor indoor air quality, lead poisoning, hazardous household products, pesticides, and much more. Available in Spanish as "Contribuya a Tener un Hogar Sano." To order, call Kathy Seikel at 703-308-8272, or email.

US EPA.  Consumer Labeling Initiative. Offers a wealth of information and free promotional items to raise awareness about the importance of reading pesticide products labels.  Promotional items available free of charge to the public include rulers, bag clips, and jar openers.  Also have developed a number of popular brochures including “Read the Label First! Protect your Household,” “Read the Label First! Protect your Garden,” “Read the Label First! Protect your Children,” and “Read the Label First! Protect your Pets.” To order, call 703-305-5017 or send an email request.

US EPA.  2002. In commemoration of National Poison Prevention Week, Mar. 17-23, EPA is making available several resources to educate the public about ways to prevent children from being poisoned by pesticides and household products. "Learn About Chemicals Around Your House" is an interactive web site (see: http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/kids/hometour/)  designed to teach children and parents about household products, including pesticides, that may contain harmful chemicals.  "Ten Tips to Protect Children from Pesticide and Lead Poisonings Around the Home" is a brochure that provides simple steps to protect children from pesticide and lead poisonings around the home, and is available in both English and Spanish. This document is available at: http://www.epa.gov/oppfead1/cb/10_tips/ "Pesticides and Child Safety" is a fact sheet that provides current household pesticide-related poisonings/exposure statistics, as well as recommendations for preventing poisonings and first aid guidelines and is available at http://www.epa.gov/ pesticides/factsheets/childsaf.htm. Finally, "Help! It's A Roach" is a roach prevention activity book for kids and parents. It teaches families what they can do to prevent and control roaches without using pesticides. An interactive Web site is also available at: http://www.epa.gov/opp00001/kids/ roaches/english/ All of these resources are also available by calling 1-800-490-9198. More information on Poison Prevention Week is also available at the Poison Prevention Week Council's website at: 
http://www.poisonprevention.org/
 

US EPA.  2000.  Learn about Chemicals Around Your House. Interactive tutorial on toxics including disinfectants and pesticides for elementary grades including house tour, product labels, first aid, word searches and scramble, crossword puzzle. Available at http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/kids/hometour/index.htm  

US EPA Region 2. 2003.  EPA's Region 2 (New York) office has developed a free CD containing several documents relating to IPM in schools: 1) "Pest Control in the School Environment," the popular 1993 EPA publication designed to acquaint readers with IPM as a potential alternative to scheduled spraying of pesticides; 2) "Who Wants to be an IPM Super Sleuth? Integrated Pest Management Activities and Resources for Kids of All Ages" developed by the IPM Institute of North America; 3) "Neato Mosquito," the CD developed by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) which contains a 4th grade curriculum designed to teach kids about mosquito biology through the use of animation, video images, interactive games, and student projects; and 4) a CDC-developed video about mosquito biology. For copies of this CD, which includes all four items above, email Henry Rupp or call 732-906-6178.

US EPA Region 8. (Denver) and the Girl Scouts Mile Hi Council. A "Bugged by Bugs" pesticide awareness patch has been developed through a partnership between the EPA and Girl Scouts, which reaches more than 36,000 girls between the ages 5-17. This exciting on-line resource can be accessed at http://www.girlscoutsmilehi.org/ content/home.cfm. The Web site http://www.girlscoutsmilehi.org/ content/home.cfm features on-line games, complete word searches and crossword puzzles which kids can tackle while learning more about safe pesticide use, risks and potential health concerns related to pesticides, as well as the IPM approach to pest control.

US EPA Region 6.  1999. Pesticide Safety Bingo Game. 49 pp. plus cards.  Beginner and advanced level games for K-6 grades about pest management and pesticides, including instructions, background information for teachers, discussion questions, picture and text cards in English and Spanish. Available at http://www.epa.gov/region6/6pd/bingo/index.htm

University of Connecticut IPM Program.  1999.  IPM Online Home Study Courses. Self-paced, tuition-free, non-credit tutorial-type courses with a certificate issued upon completion including IPM for cockroaches, ants/termites, turfgrass, garden weed and insect pests, resistance of woody ornamental plants to deer damage.  Available at http://www.canr.uconn.edu/ces/ipm/homecourse/coursinfo.htm

University of Florida Department of Entomology and Nematology.  2002. Posters on a variety of pests. The posters help identify many common pests in the home or community. Go to the UF/IFAS Extension Bookstore to view or call (800) 226-1764 to order.

University of Florida Department of Entomology and Nematology.  2000. Best of the Bugs Web Site. List of top web sites covering insects, mites and nematodes, including sites with teaching curricula. Available at  http://pests.ifas.ufl.edu/bestbugs/

University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Pest Private Eye Game: The Case of IPM in Schools.  Learn about pests and IPM tools and use them to solve your own case!  Available at http://schoolipm.unl.edu/pestpi/

Wyoming Agriculture in the Classroom.  A Kid's Journey to Understanding Weeds. Elementary school-level activities for students organized around 11 noxious weeds. Available at http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/phpps/ipc/weededucation/ Education_K-12/journey3rdgrade.htm

Back to Links & Resources - Contents

School IPM and Related Resources in Spanish and Other Non-English Languages

ATTRA. 2004. El Manejo Integrado Organico de Algunas Plagas de la Agricultura. (Organic Integrated Pest Management Manual). Spanish-language pictorial field guide to organic IPM. Focuses on ecologically based strategies that prevent insect and vertebrate pests, diseases, and weeds from becoming a problem in the first place. Guides feature color photos of important pests and beneficial organisms. Brief text provides take-home messages for farmers. English-language version coming soon.  

Drlik, T. Spanish IPM fact sheets include Argentine ants, cockroaches.  Bio-Intergral Resource Center, PO Box 7414 Berkeley, CA 94707, phone (510) 524-8404.

Hollingsworth, C.  2002.  What is Integrated Pest Management? An explanation of IPM, monitoring, natural enemies, habitat modification and pesticides in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Italian, Khmer, Vietnamese and Chinese.  Available from University of Massachusetts Extension, www.umass.edu/umext/bookstore/

National Pest Management Association. Pest management materials, including biology and management of bumblebees, carpenter ants, fruit flies, German cockroaches, head and body lice, and pavement ants, plus diseases transmitted by pests. All are able to be translated into Spanish, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, or Portuguese.  Available at http://www.pestworld.org/.

National Pesticide Information Center. Oregon State University.  Publications and fact sheets in Spanish. http://npic.orst.edu/index.es.html 

New York State Department of Health. Spanish brochures include management of mosquitoes, mice, West Nile virus plus tick and insect repellents. http://www.health.state.ny.us/ nysdoh/pest/pesticid.htm

Penn State.  2003.  Extension Fact Sheets. Entomology fact sheets available for aphids, black vine weevils, eastern tent caterpillars, Japanese beetles, five types of cockroaches, pavement ants, cereal and pantry pests, cigarette beetles, larder beetles, bedbugs, lice and Pennsylvania spiders available in Spanish. Available to download for free at http://www.ento.psu.edu/extension/ fact_sheets.html.  For more information, contact the department at (814) 865-1895 or visit the department's Web site at http://www.ento.psu.edu/.

Pennsylvania IPM Program.  2004.  "Unete a Nuestra Patrull contra las Plaga."   Translated version of "Join Our Pest Patrol" publication is fun, educational resource for Pennsylvania teachers of students in grades 3-4.  Like the English version, the workbook is designed to serve two audiences; elementary school students who must learn about IPM to meet the new Academic Standards in environment and ecology, section 4.5.4, "Integrated Pest Management," and kids in 4-H programs. Copies of the Join Our Pest Patrol publication in Spanish can be downloaded as printable PDF files from the PA IPM Program's web site at http://paipm.cas.psu.edu/pestpatrol.html.
    

Reigart, J. R. and J. R. Roberts. 1999.  Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings, 5th edition.  236 pp. Toxicology, signs and symptoms of poisoning and treatment for more than 1500 products, in 19 chapters. Covers new pesticide products "that have come on the market since 1989, includes a new chapter on disinfectants and reviews of clinical experiences with pesticide poisonings. US EPA., request in print by phone to 703-305-7666 Fax: 703 308-2962, available in electronic format at: http://www.epa.gov/oppfead1/safety/ spanish/healthcare/handbook/handbook.htm

Safer Pest Control Project.  "Alternativas a los Pesticidas en la Casa." 2 pp.  Two-page fact sheet about alternatives to pesticides in the home, including an explanation of IPM. Available at http://www.spcpweb.org/homespanish.pdf.

Safer Pest Control Project. Comic-style book in Spanish "La Invasion de los Insectos", addresses cockroach IPM in public housing. Available from Safer Pest Control Project, 25 E. Washington St, Suite 1515, Chicago, IL 60602, (312) 641-5575, Fax (312) 641-5454, Email, Website http://www.spcpweb.org/

Safer Pest Control Project.  Lawns We Can Live With. 2-page fact sheet containing information about lawn care.  Available at http://www.spcpweb.org/lawnsspanish.pdf.

Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Entomology Spanish language publications, includes  Cockroaches, How to Control Cockroaches at Home, Control of Rats And Mice, Fleas, Flea Control, House Infesting Ants, How to Control Ants at Home, Subterranean Termites, The Two Step Fire Ant Control, Ticks, Tick Control. Available at http://tcebookstore.org/pubbrowse.cfm?catid=146

University of Florida IFAS Extension. ABCs of IPM. The ABC's of IPM: A Video-based Pest Management Training Program for Schools and pest managers. The ABCs of IPM video set is a comprehensive training program for school employees. Passing the quizzes associated with the modules will qualify for 2 FDACS CEUs. Cost is $40. Available at https://eces.ifas.ufl.edu/elearning/study/registerlesson/listRegisterCourses-frame.faces?oid=16598840

University of Massachusetts.  What is Integrated Pest Management? This informative brochure is available through the University of Massachusetts in nine different languages including English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Italian, Khmer, Vietnamese and Chinese. Available at http://www.umass.edu/umext/ipm/ ipm_projects/school.html.

University of Minnesota Extension Service. Materials in Spanish include "Cockroaches - Your Safe Home," (also in  English, Laotian, Cambodian and Hmong); "Molds - Your Safe Home" (English, Laotian, Cambodian, Hmong and Somali). Available at: http://www.extension.umn.edu/pesticides/IPM/ pubstruct.htm

University of Nebraska Cooperative Extension.  Head Lice Resources You Can Trust. Family guide with practical, simple directions on head lice control in Spanish and English.  Also includes online "Removing Head Lice Safely" video in both Spanish, Arabic and English. Available at http://lancaster.unl.edu/ enviro/HeadLice/Resources.htm.

University of Wisconsin's Home*Asyst.  2003.  Free copies of the Spanish version of "Help Yourself to Healthy Home" (Contribuya a Tener un Hogar Sano) are now available. This booklet is geared for the consumer and answers important questions about the home and how you live in it. Every chapter  provides basic information about a particular environmental issue, e.g. indoor air quality, pesticides, carbon monoxide, lead, mold and moisture, etc.  Interested in copies, email Kathy Seikel or call  703-308-8272.  

US EPA  2003.  "10 Medidas Para Proteger A Sus Nińos De Los Pesticidas Y Del Envenenamiento Debido Al Plomo." This Spanish/English brochure outlines the ten most important steps you can take to protect children from accidental  poisonings associated with the presence of lead and pesticides in the home.  Available at http://www.epa.gov/oppfod01/cb/10_tips/childesp.htm.

US EPA Region 6 (Dallas).  2003.  "Tres Amigos al Rescate." A new education and outreach package aimed at Spanish-speaking communities.  The core component of this package is an entertaining and informative video that appeals to children and adults alike and provides practical information on safe  use of household chemicals, including pesticides. The video is accompanied by a companion booklet, also in Spanish, designed for parents, teachers, and moderators.  A helpful discussion guide and fact sheet complete the package and set the stage for stimulating discussions about steps people can take to 
make their homes environmentally safe.
To order "Tres Amigos al Rescate," email Amadee Madril or call 214-665-2767.  

US EPA. 2004. Proper household pesticide storage and disposal in Spanish. Spanish-speaking individuals can now view in Spanish EPA’s household consumer information on  proper pesticide storage and
disposal. To access, visit
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/regulating/storage.htm and click on the “En espanol” button above the “Quick Resources” box.

US EPA. Pest management materials in Spanish include "Ten Tips to Protect Children from Pesticides and Lead Poisonings around the Home" (tri-fold brochure); "Pesticides and Child Safety" (3-page tip sheet); "How to Protect Children from Environmental Threats" (brochure, IPM plus other issues, very attractive presentation and practical tips); "Pesticides and Food: What Your Family Needs to Know."  Request in print by phone to 703-305-7666 Fax: 703 308-2962.

US EPA, Region 2. Materials in Spanish include brochure plus public service 
announcements on illegal pesticides. 
Available at: http://www.epa.gov/region02/
health/chalk.htm

US EPA.  2002. Socorro! Una Cucaracha! (Help! It's a Roach!).  The Spanish  version of the popular pest prevention activity book for children is now on-line.  The activities have been designed to be interactive, to provide a fun way to learn about managing indoor insect pests. The messages of removing food, water, and shelter apply to many pests, not just cockroaches. The web version is found at http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/kids/roaches/spanish/.  Paper versions are available from EPA's publication center, http://www.epa.gov/ ncepihom/ordering.htm (EPA 735-F-98-016?English and EPA  735-F-01-004?Spanish).

US EPA. Contribuya a Tener un Hogar Sano. Popular 56-page booklet contains helpful information for parents, grandparents and other care givers.  Contains information on  environmental contaminants found in many American homes and how to protect your family from risks posed by carbon monoxide, unhealthy drinking waters, poor indoor air quality, lead poisoning, hazardous household products, pesticides, and much more. To order, call Kathy Seikel at 703-308-8272, or email.

US EPA.  2003. “Learn to Use Pesticides Safely"  (available as a poster or bumper sticker) and “Pesticides Are Meant to Poison These... [BUGS] Not These” [KIDS] (available in poster format only) now available. Free copies of posters and stickers (bumper sticker size) urging consumers to use pesticides safely are available in both English and Spanish. Recognized for their colorful, eye-catching graphics and message, enlarged versions of these posters and stickers have appeared on trucks and metropolitan buses and trains traveling through the urban sectors of many cities.  To order, write U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pesticide Programs (7506C), Communication Services Branch, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W.Washington, DC 20460-0001 or call 703-305-5017.  For orders larger than 10 copies, please contact the National Service Center for Environmental Publications (NSCEP) at 1-800-490-9198.

Back to Links & Resources - Contents


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Related Pages:

Introduction and information to calculating a score on the IPM Institute's IPM Standards for Schools

Bibliography of IPM certification, labeling and marketing

Bibliography for school buildings including pest-specific links and resources

Bibliography for school landscapes and grounds

Headlines on School IPM

The IPM Institute's interactive website, Who Wants to be an IPM Super Sleuth

Articles:

 

"Pest Management Issues in Urban Settings Discussed"

"Keystone State adopts environmental schoolbook, includes IPM unit"

"Questions About School IPM Now Answered Online" 

"What you can do about spraying pesticides near schools"

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Last modified: November 16, 2009
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