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IPM for School Landscapes & Grounds

 

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Introduction & Appendices - HTML Format
Part I. IPM Standards for School Buildings - HTML Format
Part II. IPM Standards for School Grounds - HTML Format


Links and Resources - HTML Format


IPM Standards Fact Sheet/Handout - PDF Format (2 pages, 191 KB)

Know of a school IPM publication or link that's not listed here?  
Suggest a publication or link.

Want the information on IPM in schools? Visit the school IPM headlines page.

 

 

 School Landscapes & Grounds Contents

 

School Landscapes & Grounds

School Intro I School Buildings I School Grounds I School Links
 School Appendices
Scorecard for School Buildings | Scorecard for Pest-Specific IPM Practices | Scorecard for School Grounds | Scorecard for Turf Cultural Management | Scorecard for Plant- and Pest-Specific IPM Practices

  

 

About MODULE ONE and MODULE TWO IPM Practices

MODULE ONE and TWO Practices are recommended for all school IPM programs, and represent an excellent starting point for new programs. These practices should be substantially completed before moving on. For certification, each MODULE ONE and TWO Practice must be substantially completed (earn 80% or more of the points available for each practice). As you work through the Standards, be sure to note which practices need improvement.

For information on how to implement IPM practices, including model IPM policies, see Information Resources for School IPM.

For an explanation of unfamiliar terms, see the Glossary.

Completed MODULE ONE or MODULE TWO? Contact us 
for an "IPM in Progress" Certificate, recognizing your accomplishment!

 

 

 

MODULE ONE: IPM FOUNDATION for School Grounds

Section 1. IPM Planning and Communication

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Appropriate personnel (e.g., superintendent, facilities manager, principal, IPM Coordinator) understand and ensure that school meets all Federal, State and local legal requirements related to pest management on school grounds (e.g., posting, notification, pesticide management, etc.). Legal requirements that exceed or conflict with practices in these Standards supercede those listed here.

20 _____

2. Resources are identified and acquired to assist in developing and implementing IPM (e.g., state/county Extension personnel, publications and on-line resources; non-governmental organizations, pest management professionals with expertise in school IPM). 

20 _____

3. A written IPM policy is adopted which 

a. states a commitment to IPM implementation; 

5 _____

b. identifies overall objectives relating to pest and pesticide risk management;

5 _____

c. is used to guide decision-making; and 

5 _____

d. is reviewed at least once every three years and revised as needed.

5 _____

4. An IPM Committee is formed to create and maintain the IPM policy, provide guidance in interpreting the policy and provide oversight of the program.

20 _____

5. An IPM Coordinator is designated to provide day-to-day oversight of IPM implementation.

20 _____

6. A plan is developed and implemented to provide necessary IPM training for the IPM Coordinator.

20 _____

7. Pest Manager is aware of and has access to resources to identify key pests.

20 _____

8. A pesticide notification policy is implemented such that: 

a. At least 24 hours prior to pesticide application, postings are placed in a designated public area detailing locations to be treated and contact information for further information (exceptions may be made for applications made for emergencies, where an imminent threat to health exists (e.g., stinging insects), or for applications of anti-microbials and for pesticides defined as Least-Impact (Appendix A); for emergency applications, postings must be placed as soon as practical);

10 _____

b. this notice remains posted for at least 48 hours after the application;

10 _____

c. copies of the pesticide label and MSDS sheet for the material(s) to be used are available on request and maintained on file in a central location (e.g., main office); and

10 _____

d. additional postings are placed on school grounds at the entry points of sites of pesticide applications in accordance with all laws.

10 _____

9. Complete, legible records of each pesticide application, including product, quantity used, date and time of application, location, application method and target pests are maintained for at least three years.

20 _____

10. Public access is provided on request to all information about the IPM policy, IPM plan and implementation.

20 _____

Section 2. Inspection, Sanitation and Exclusion

1. At least a preliminary review of school grounds is conducted to determine nature and extent of pest problems and contributing factors. This information is used to set IPM priorities.

20 _____

Section 3. Pest and Pesticide Risk Management

1. All pesticide applications are made by a person certified and/or licensed by the state to apply pesticides in commercial settings and treatment areas (e.g., turf).

20 _____

2. All pesticide applications are made only after detection of a verifiable pest problem and accurate identification of the pest. Applications are not made on a routine or regularly scheduled basis (e.g., weekly, monthly applications are not made).

20 _____

3. At least a preliminary review of pesticide use practices on school grounds is conducted to evaluate pesticide risks. This information is used to set priorities for reducing or replacing high-risk pesticides and use practices.

20 _____

Total MODULE ONE IPM Points Available
Total MODULE ONE Points Earned

300 _____

Back to Part II. IPM Standards for School Grounds - Contents

Evaluating Your Performance

Perfection is an ideal rarely accomplished in the real world. When evaluating your performance on IPM practices listed in these standards, use a critical eye to identify areas for improvement. Make a note of the action needed, and score the practice accordingly. Remember, continuous improvement in reducing pests and pesticide risks is the goal, not a perfect score.

For certification purposes, Certified IPM Verifiers will also apply this perspective, working with you in a supportive manner to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of your IPM program.

 

MODULE TWO: IPM FRAMEWORK for School Grounds

Section 1. IPM Planning and Communication

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Pest management roles are developed for and communicated at least annually to:

a) administrators (e.g., principals regarding posting, notification, reporting, etc.);

5 _____

b) teachers (e.g., do not bring in/apply pesticides, sanitation, etc.);

5 _____

c) custodians (e.g., pest sightings log, inspection, sanitation, exclusion, etc.);

5 _____

d) food handlers (e.g., sanitation, exclusion, etc.); and

5 _____

e) outside contractors (e.g., IPM policy, posting, pest control options to outside pest, landscape and turf management professionals).

5 _____

2. Pest management roles are developed for and communicated at least on an as needed basis (e.g., head lice incident):

a) students (e.g., reporting, sanitation, head lice prevention, etc.); and

5 _____

b) parents (e.g., no nit policy).

5 _____

3. A written IPM Plan is prepared that includes a schedule for inspection and monitoring of school grounds and schedule for areas requiring more frequent inspection/ monitoring (e.g., athletic fields).

20 _____

4. If outside contractors provide pest control services, a written contract is signed identifying specific IPM practices to be used including regular inspections, monitoring where appropriate, record-keeping and agreement to abide by the IPM Policy and IPM Plan, including use of only Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options for schools pursuing certification. If outside contractors are not used, score as N/A.

20 _____

5. A Pest Sightings/Damage Log is maintained in a designated area (e.g., main office). Turf and landscape maintenance staff, athletic department staff and others who supervise those using school grounds are instructed to report all pest-related incidents to the log including date, time, exact location, a description of the pest or pest damage and the name of the person reporting the incident. Pest Manager reviews reports promptly, and records and dates responses taken to each report. May be part of an overall maintenance issue reporting system.

20 _____

6. School notifies all students, staff and others requesting special consideration in the event of a pesticide application:

a) school provides direct notification to those individuals at least 48 hours in advance of any pesticide application; and

10 _____

b) school communicates that this notification option is available to parents and staff at least annually.

Exceptions may be made where an imminent threat to health exists (e.g., stinging insects), or for applications of pesticides defined as Least-Impact, or for situations where the school grounds will be unoccupied for 72 hours. For emergency applications, postings must be placed as soon as practical.

10 _____

7. Key staff (e.g., IPM Coordinator, Pest Manager, turf and landscape maintenance staff) participate in IPM training at least annually. Training is adequate and appropriate to the IPM roles fulfilled by these staff members.

20 _____

Section 2. Inspection, Sanitation and Exclusion

1. A comprehensive inspection of all school grounds is conducted by an in-house or contracted pest management professional for defects including cracks in walkways and driveways; food, moisture and shelter resources available to pests; moisture, pest or other damage to fences, retaining walls, irrigation and drainage systems, etc.; pest runways, pest fecal matter or other signs of pest activity; etc. A report of all defects is prepared and corrective actions are identified.

20 _____

2. Legible records are maintained of inspection results, including date, pests and/or pest damage found and location, estimate of pest density or damage level, recommendation, actions taken and evaluations of results.

20 _____

3. A timeline is established for completion of corrective actions and evaluation of results.

20 _____

Section 3. Pest and Pesticide Risk Management

1. Pesticide inventories are maintained only if personnel properly licensed to apply those pesticides are on staff. Storage is tightly controlled to prevent unauthorized access. If pesticide inventories are not maintained by the school, score as N/A.

20 _____

2. Baits (e.g., for rodents), if used, are (If pests are managed effectively without baits, score 2a.-f.as N/A):

a) placed in areas inaccessible or off-limits to children;

5 _____

b) placed in a locked, distinctively marked, tamper-resistant container designed specifically for holding baits and constructed of metal, plastic or wood;

5 _____

c) used in bait containers securely attached to immovable objects such that the container cannot be picked up and moved;

5 _____

d) placed in the baffle-protected feeding chamber of the bait container and not in the runway;

5 _____

e) If used in wet areas, are parafinized or weatherproof ; and

5 _____

f) not used outdoors unless bait containers are inaccessible to children (e.g., placed underground in pest nests or on building roofs). 

5 _____

3. Reduced-Impact or Least-Impact Options are the only methods used.

20 _____

Total MODULE TWO IPM Points Available
Total Points Not Applicable
Total MODULE TWO Points Earned

265
_____
_____


Back to Part II. IPM Standards for School Grounds - Contents

About MODULE THREE IPM Practices

Not all MODULE THREE IPM Practices are appropriate for all schools. Choose the ones that will be most effective for your IPM program. For certification, you must implement enough practices to earn an overall 70% score for all three modules, including applicable pest-specific sections. Most schools will need to complete just a few of the pest-specific sections.

 

MODULE THREE: IPM Administration & Policy Practices for School Grounds

Section 1. IPM Planning and Communication

Points
Available

Points
Earned

1. Priority: The IPM Plan includes a list of key pests and action thresholds for each key pest (even if threshold is one, i.e., no tolerance).

20 _____

2. Priority: The IPM Plan includes a list of management options to be used when key pest problems occur and specifies lesser risk options (e.g., sanitation, exclusion) to be used before resorting to actions with greater risk factors. 

20 _____

3. The IPM Plan includes a list of actions to prevent and avoid key pest problems (e.g., replacement of problem plants, moving problem plants to more favorable locations, slope modification, pavement replacement and repair) and a timeline for implementation.

20 _____

4. If outside professional pest management or grounds maintenance contractors are used, bids are evaluated not only on the basis of cost but also on contractor (If outside contractors are not used, score as N/A):

a) experience and performance history with an IPM approach;

5 _____

b) ability to conduct preventative inspections;

5 _____

c) ability to apply treatments after school hours; and

5 _____

d) demonstrated practice of using lowest risk control options first. 

5 _____

5. The IPM Plan specifies preventative and avoidance strategies for grounds maintenance and new or renovated landscape design such as avoiding pest-prone plants, proper placement, etc.

10 _____

6. The IPM Plan divides turf and landscape areas by basic use level (i.e., athletic fields vs. lawns, highly visible vs. less visible landscape areas). Monitoring frequency and thresholds are appropriate to each level.

5 _____

7. The IPM Plan subdivides turf areas by advanced level of use (i.e., athletic fields with limited use for publicly attended events vs. athletic fields for daily practice and general use) and monitoring schedules and action thresholds are appropriate to each level.

5 _____

8. A complete inventory of all existing lawn maintenance equipment is maintained, as well as a list of desired equipment for reduced risk pest control options (e.g., aerator, de-thatcher, spring-tooth harrow, flotation tires, etc.). Desired equipment is worked into the budget over time.

10 _____

9. Grounds staff or Pest Manager reads an Extension newsletter/report of current pest information in season. If not available, score as N/A.

10 _____

10. Information bulletins are distributed at least annually to inform staff, students, parents and others as appropriate about key IPM issues such as roles, reporting, sanitation, etc.

10 _____

11. School notifies staff and parents at least 48 hours in advance of the application of any pesticide not on the Least-Impact Pest Control Option List. Such notification may be incorporated in any notice being sent to staff or parents meeting the 48-hour advance timing. Exceptions may be made for applications made for emergencies, where an imminent threat to health exists (e.g., stinging insects). For emergency applications, notification must be made as soon as practical.

10 _____

12. Bonus: Teachers incorporate school grounds IPM or general IPM concepts into curricula and/or class projects.

10 _____

Section 2. Inspection, Exclusion and Sanitation

1. A written IPM inspection checklist or form is used for periodic inspections, listing each landscape feature (e.g., lawns, playing fields, walkways, driveways, etc.) to be inspected, including specific locations within features (e.g., retaining walls) to be covered in the inspection and specific conditions to be noted (e.g., repair, cleaning needs).

10 _____

2. Monitoring traps, plant phenology and/or growing degree days are used to predict pest activity and schedule monitoring activities.

10 _____

3. Pest management roles communicated to staff and students include proper disposal of food or food wrappers.

10 _____

4. Litter is collected and properly disposed of from school grounds at least weekly.

10 _____

5. Bonus: Food and beverages are allowed only in limited designated areas.

10 _____

6. Outdoor garbage containers and storage are placed away from building entrances.

10 _____

7. Outdoor garbage containers are emptied frequently to prevent accumulated trash from blocking door closure.

10 _____

8. Outdoor garbage containers, dumpsters, compactors and storage are placed on hard, cleanable surfaces.

10 _____

9. Outdoor garbage containers have spring-loaded lids to exclude pests.

10 _____

10. Outdoor garbage containers are washed on at least a monthly basis, including spill-contaminated areas around containers.

10 _____

11. Cracks and crevices in paved areas are corrected.

10 _____

12. Stored waste is collected and moved off site at least once weekly.

10 _____

13. Bonus: Stored waste is collected and moved off site at least twice weekly.

10 _____

14. Recyclables are collected and moved off site at least weekly.

10 _____

15. Bonus: Recyclables are collected and moved off site at least twice weekly.

10 _____

Section 3. Pest and Pesticide Risk Management

1. Priority: When pest problems requiring action occur, appropriate lesser risk options are used first.

20 _____

2. Priority: All pesticide application equipment is calibrated at the start of each season. Records (date, calibrator, etc.) are maintained for 3 years.

10 _____

3. Priority: Pesticide and fertilizers are loaded into application equipment over a hard surface where spills can be promptly and thoroughly contained and cleaned, without danger of spill leaching into soil or runoff into soil, drains or sewers.

10 _____

4. All pesticide application equipment is re-calibrated at mid-season.

10 _____

5. Pesticide applications are limited to affected areas, plants or plant parts rather than treating an entire management unit, group of plants or entire plant, respectively, as per monitoring results (e.g., one corner of a lawn is treated for grubs, or one shrub or portion of a shrub is treated).

10 _____

6. When effective control can be achieved at reduced rates, pesticide applications are made at less than the maximum labeled rate.

10 _____

7. Where appropriate (e.g., herbicide applications), a colorant is used to mark the treated area.

10 _____

8. If baits or traps of any kind are used (If pests are managed effectively without baits or traps, score 8a.-d. as N/A.):

a) a map or floor plan of each area where baits or traps are located is prepared; 

5 _____

b) each bait station or trap is numbered and entered on the map; 

5 _____

c) they are marked with appropriate warning language; 

5 _____

d) and checked at least once per month. 

5 _____

9. Inventory is managed to track current stock, use and ensure proper disposal of unused materials and empties. If pesticide inventories are not maintained by the school, score as N/A.

10 _____

10. Bonus: Least-Impact Options are the only pest controls used.

10 _____

11. Bonus: No pesticides are stored on school grounds.

10 _____

12. Bonus: Action thresholds for pesticide applications correspond with pest pressure sufficient to cause physiological injury, not aesthetic injury.

10 _____

13. Bonus: Teachers incorporate pest and pesticide risk management into curricula and/or class projects.

10 _____

Total MODULE THREE Administration and Policy IPM Points Available
Total Points Not Applicable
Total MODULE THREE Administration and Policy IPM Points Earned

375
_____
_____

Back to Part II. IPM Standards for School Grounds - Contents


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Related Pages:

Introduction and information to calculating a score on the IPM Institute's IPM Standards for Schools

Bibliography for school landscapes and grounds

Plant- and Pest-Specific IPM Practices for School Grounds

IPM Scorecard for School Grounds

Turf Cultural Management

 

Articles:

 

"What you can do about spraying pesticides near schools"

"Pest Management Issues in Urban Settings Discussed"

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Last modified: July 28, 2009
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